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Blue Quarks with a Not-Quite-Voxel subwoofer

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  • ceiol
    replied
    Originally posted by donradick View Post
    Beautiful and innovative cosmetics!
    thanks Don!

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  • andykriech
    replied
    Thanks john, good info and looks good on your speakers too.
    ak

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  • JohnBooty
    replied
    Looks great!

    IMO my results are not quite as nice as that gorgeous veneer the OP used.

    But, for those who are interested in a colored stain without tackling the the challenge of veneer... you can get a similar look by staining the wood with Rit Fabric dye, purchased from any WalMart or craft store.

    It's dead simple to use - simply brush it or rub it on, right out of the bottle. No need to follow the directions on the bottle regarding mixing the dye with hot water, since you're not dying fabric. Once it's fully dry (you may want to wait a few days) rub a wax seal onto it. Rit's advice: https://www.ritdye.com/wood-and-wicker-technique/


    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnbo...7660778178773/

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnbo...7660778178773/

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  • donradick
    replied
    Beautiful and innovative cosmetics!

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  • ceiol
    replied
    Originally posted by andykriech View Post
    Great looking combo.
    What wood species is your veneer and how did you get the great blue color?
    andy.
    the blue veneer was from here
    https://www.dyed-veneer.com/Dyed-Dee...2-1-1-1-2.aspx

    dyed deep blue kyoto veneer

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  • andykriech
    replied
    Great looking combo.
    What wood species is your veneer and how did you get the great blue color?
    andy.

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  • Chris Roemer
    replied
    Yes. To model the (textbook?) 2nd order LP filter you used, I took the simmed FR in YOUR box (using WinISD "Pro") and its simmed Z-profile; then applied THAT 9mH series coil and 280uF (? was it) shunt cap in XO sim software. If you're familiar w/the "double-hump" (and valley) Z-curve of a vented box, you can appreciate the wild impedance "roller coaster" that the LP filter is trying to control. It's for those reasons that a passive filter typically won't do a very good job at rolling off the bottom end of a driver (so . . . a "high pass" filter) in the vicinity of its in-box resonance.

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  • ceiol
    replied
    here is the modeling using the TS parameters of the W5-1138SMF in a 0.2 cubic foot box
    port of 1.5" x 12" long

    I tried the sub box without the LP filter and it certainly helps taper down the 100 Hz and above sounds. Without it, there's too much mid-bass (150-200 Hz) in the subwoofer due to the high set point of the active crossover in the 2.1 amp

    with or without the LP filter, the lower bass (< 100 Hz) sounds the same to me. The modeling with TS parameters doesn't show the values that you calculated above -- so those must be induced (at least in theory) by the LP filter?

    Click image for larger version

Name:	W5-1138 in 0.2 cu ft port 1.5 x 12.gif
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  • ceiol
    replied
    Originally posted by Chris Roemer View Post
    That LP filter (9.1mH / 280uF) doesn't affect much below 30Hz, but . . .
    It drops that W5 in YOUR tuned box about -2dB @ 40Hz.
    Close to no effect @ 50.
    @ 60 +1dB
    @ 70-80 +3 to +4dB
    @ 100, +/-0
    @ 200 -12dB - (that's the filter's transfer function)

    So, it actually doesn't do a bad job at rolling the sub's highs off passively.
    The response you end up with peaks around 70Hz.
    F3s are near 60 & 90Hz.
    F6s are near 50 & 110Hz.
    F10s near 40 & 130Hz.

    thanks for this. As a novice, it helps to learn.

    Would I be better off just omitting the LP filter?

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  • Chris Roemer
    replied
    That LP filter (9.1mH / 280uF) doesn't affect much below 30Hz, but . . .
    It drops that W5 in YOUR tuned box about -2dB @ 40Hz.
    Close to no effect @ 50.
    @ 60 +1dB
    @ 70-80 +3 to +4dB
    @ 100, +/-0
    @ 200 -12dB - (that's the filter's transfer function)

    So, it actually doesn't do a bad job at rolling the sub's highs off passively.
    The response you end up with peaks around 70Hz.
    F3s are near 60 & 90Hz.
    F6s are near 50 & 110Hz.
    F10s near 40 & 130Hz.

    Leave a comment:


  • stephenmarklay
    replied
    I will be putting together a micro system for my kitchen and this looks great. I have seen the bantams here and those look slick too.

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  • ceiol
    replied
    This is the passive low pass filter that I used

    https://www.parts-express.com/parts-...sover--266-444

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  • ceiol
    replied
    Inside view
    Attached Files

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  • ceiol
    replied
    Attached Files

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  • ceiol
    replied
    Originally posted by Jake View Post
    Nice kitchen. That's one heck of a 2.1 system. I had plans to do the same, but sold my quarks due to my wife complaining about too much stereo stuff. I may build them again in the future though.
    The subwoofer really compliments the Quarks nicely.

    Leave a comment:

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