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  • Radishmcadish
    commented on 's reply
    I just did a set of 2 Ways in 3/4 solid red oak. I used to paint cars for a living and I wouldn't use poly unless it's 2 part (not from a can). I would recommend clear lacquer because it is dries hard fast and is easy too work with.

  • joshshetter
    replied
    Did some measurements today to make sure everything was working right, pretty happy with the results.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hoven
    commented on 's reply
    My guess would be any oil finish, including Danish Oil, would have grain reversal and blotching. I don't have direct experience with pine, though. Do you see these issues with your test pieces? Ultimately it's up to you if you like the look that Danish Oil brings.

    Danish Oil with a poly coat on top is fine, as long as you let the Danish Oil dry thoroughly. As a general rule, it's ok to put any finish on top of another finish, as long as the first finish is dry. There are exceptions to this rule, though. Here is a nice article about finish compatibility: https://www.popularwoodworking.com/f...compatibility/.

  • joshshetter
    commented on 's reply
    That is a heck of a finish procedure, the "finished" result at the end looks quite good though. I don't intend to stain these though. I am testing some things like Danish oil and then a poly coat over top. Does that sound alright? I'm still a little confused about what oils and finishes can be used together. But I won't be able to do much for awhile, it just started snowing here and boy is it cold outside. My poor garage is basically a few degrees warmer and that's it.

  • Hoven
    replied
    Originally posted by joshshetter View Post
    The wood is pine.
    Pine can be tricky to finish. One problem is grain reversal. When staining pine, the earlywood soaks stain while the latewood is denser and soaks less stain, and the result is that the grain ends up being lighter than its surroundings. Another issue is blotching, which happens often with pine. See https://www.popularwoodworking.com/t...staining-pine/ for a picture of these issues. I'm not advocating their finishing method, though. I'm sure it works, but it seems pretty complex to me.

    I think an oil finish is likely to have the grain reversal and blotching issues.

    One way to finish pine is to leave it unstained, and apply a clear film finish to it. A clear varnish, poly, or laquer would do. An oil based finish will add an amber coloring to the wood. A water based one will not, and leave the wood looking like it is right now. Over time, pine will turn amber on its own as it ages.

    As mentioned earlier, try out any finishing methods on scrap pieces, to see what the final result looks like.

    Leave a comment:


  • joshshetter
    replied
    Returning the bad DC160.

    Does this speaker have a recommended amount of internal stuffing. I've got a good bit of stuffing in there and feeling it may be a bit too much.

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  • Chris Roemer
    replied
    Send it back. Dayton drivers are warrantied for 5 yrs. ;-)

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  • joshshetter
    replied
    The wood is pine.

    I noticed something on my dc160's. One of them has weird bubbled up glue on the basket and magnet and you can move it all around pretty easily with your hands. The whole motor just shifts. The other one is fine. Should I be concerned and does PE have any kind of warranty on this since it's obviously a manufacturing error?

    Leave a comment:


  • Hoven
    replied
    Very nice looking cabinets! What wood is that?

    If applying poly on top of an oil coat, you want to wait several days for the oil finish to dry thoroughly. About a week in warm temperatures. More information: https://www.popularwoodworking.com/f...finish-on-top/.

    For my only speaker build, I did Danish Oil, then applied a clear gel varnish on top. I think it worked well, but it was my first experience with finishing, so I can't really compare to anything else.

    Leave a comment:


  • joshshetter
    commented on 's reply
    Thanks for the tips, yeah going to try a few options. I've had mostly oil finishes recommend. Today I went to the store and bought a ton of L brackets and screw to the inside joints to hopefully prevent too much movement from humidity changes since the whole thing is hardwood (well technically softwood).

  • Geoff Millar
    commented on 's reply
    Those cabinets look really nice: whatever finish you're considering, test some options on scrap material and see how you like them after a few days. It would be worth bringing out the grain, so tung oil might be an option. If you don't want to buy some, see if neighbours or friends have some, plus a few other materials to try out?

    Geoff

  • joshshetter
    replied
    So this is where I'm stopping with the Classix II for now. The weather is too cold in my shop to do the finish I want, so I'll just wait until things warm up a bit to do that. In the mean time I just wanted to hear the dang things! I ended up tossing in PVC tube for the port and used a roundover bit to get it curved and flush with the baffle. Man I have to say it looks really snazzy doing it that way. Got the idea from the Bagby Mandolin build on audiosciencereview. I will probably put the ports that came with the amiga up for sale (free really) here. Too flimsy for my tastes, and I did recently do a port test and the spectogram is what I found by dampening a ringy port. Sound wayyy better than they did in the cheap cabinets.

    I think I'm going to finish these in some sort of oil, danish, tung, and then a good poly coat (may have someone else do that, not sure yet). I'm still doing a lot of research on wood finishes and it just makes it harder to decide. Open to ideas!

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  • wogg
    commented on 's reply
    I'm pretty sure a significant portion of woodworking "skills" is having the resources and smarts to get the right tools, like good router bits

  • joshshetter
    replied
    Good tip, thanks! I think I will just use PVC, glue it into the hole then route over the edge. I'll have a lot more confidence with that than the generally thin plastic used on cheap ports.

    Amiga thread coming soon.

    Leave a comment:


  • djg
    commented on 's reply
    You can make a port from PVC pipe if you don't like the look of the plastic item. The PE parts list shows that as the port in the kit. Yes, please start an Amiga build thread. Your box looks nice.
    Last edited by djg; 01-09-2022, 08:20 PM.
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