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  • r-carpenter
    replied
    Originally posted by Sydney View Post
    My first wood shop projects ( Chicago 1967 ) were finished with Shellac
    http://archives.chicagotribune.com/1...dustry-product
    Shellac is a great looking finish. French-polished shellac is by far one of the most spectacular ways to finish a well crafted piece of furniture if high gloss is needed.

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  • Sydney
    replied
    Originally posted by r-carpenter View Post
    ... Most of the American furniture of 1940th to late 1960s were finished exactly this way. ...
    My first wood shop projects ( Chicago 1967 ) were finished with Shellac
    http://archives.chicagotribune.com/1...dustry-product

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  • r-carpenter
    replied
    yeah, it is shellac. http://www.rustoleum.com/MSDS/ENGLISH/854.pdf

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  • r-carpenter
    replied
    Originally posted by Kevin K. View Post

    A coat (or two) of Zinsser Seal Coat between the oil and lacquer wouldn't prevent the compatibility issues? Or would there be a compatibility problem between the tung oil and Zinsser?
    Zinseser seal is probably shellac. Shellac is and was widely used as a sealer. It builds up quick and has a nice hew. Spray additives have been prohibited for shellac because of highly cancerogenous nature. So, nice stuff that's hard to spray. But... (always a little opsy) depending on the lacquer, you can't really use it as a sealer. Most of the American furniture of 1940th to late 1960s were finished exactly this way. Shellac as a sealer and lacquer topcoat. If you ever are in an antique store and see alligatored finish on the American ArtDeco chest of drawers or a bedroom set, that's the result.
    Shellac can be used as a sealer prior to oil. Lacquers have their own sealers that are also not compatible with oil.
    I would suggest, if you already applied oil finish, stick with it. Having a bit of darkening over time is not a big deal but having your finish deteriorating is.
    BTW, it's not the wood that darkens over time. It's the oil itself that oxidizes. You would slow the process by applying different finish over it, albiet at a high risk of finish failure.

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  • tomzarbo
    replied
    Originally posted by Kevin K. View Post
    Thanks guys.

    Yea, lots of block sanding Tom. I used a straight angle die grinder with this bit http://www.veneersupplies.com/produc...outer-Bit.html to rough cut the veneer by hand and then finished the rest with the sanding block. Did you ever pick up one of these cutters Tom? Worth their weight in gold if you ask me.

    I've done a little experimenting with the Danish oil Mike but didn't try thinning it, might give that a whirl on some scraps to see how it looks. Thanks.
    I have not yet. Looks like I should. I still have just a bit of room in my router bit cabinet.

    TomZ

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  • Kevin K.
    replied
    Originally posted by r-carpenter View Post
    You don't want to lacquer over oil. Compatibility issues.
    A coat (or two) of Zinsser Seal Coat between the oil and lacquer wouldn't prevent the compatibility issues? Or would there be a compatibility problem between the tung oil and Zinsser?

    Leave a comment:


  • r-carpenter
    replied
    You don't want to lacquer over oil. Compatibility issues.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sydney
    replied
    Originally posted by Kevin K. View Post
    It's my understanding that a lot of users don't topcoat Tung Oil so a new or fresh coat could be applied as time required. What if it was sealed and then lacquered over? Do you think it would still continue to darken that way?
    I've not tried that to know; so far both Tung and Teak have worked well after 10+ years. Linseed Oil pieces were dark after close to 40 years.

    Leave a comment:


  • Navy Guy
    replied
    Originally posted by Kevin K.
    It's my understanding that a lot of users don't topcoat Tung Oil so a new or fresh coat could be applied as time required. What if it was sealed and then lacquered over? Do you think it would still continue to darken that way?
    If you want to keep the wood from darkening you need to use a water based finish. All oil based finishes will cause the wood to darken. Some do more than others and I'm not sure which is best for limiting the amount of darkening, but water based is really the only way to prevent the finish from causing it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Millstonemike
    replied
    Originally posted by Kevin K. View Post

    It's my understanding that a lot of users don't topcoat Tung Oil so a new or fresh coat could be applied as time required.
    I read the gunsmiths finishing stocks apply 1 coat a day for a week, 1 coat a week for a month and 1 coat a month for a year. Then once a year after that. That last line and my experience with danish oil is that left alone, touch-up is just applying another coat.

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  • Kevin K.
    replied
    Originally posted by Sydney View Post
    My understanding ( from those who have pieces using Bold Linseed for decades ) is yes.
    I do have older pieces treated with Tung Oil that don't appear to gotten substantially darker yet.
    The contention ( but no consensus ) is that such oils vary and some are filtered of substances that darken with age.
    I've been using Teak Oil, but these pieces are not many years oils.
    It's my understanding that a lot of users don't topcoat Tung Oil so a new or fresh coat could be applied as time required. What if it was sealed and then lacquered over? Do you think it would still continue to darken that way?

    Leave a comment:


  • Sydney
    replied
    My understanding ( from those who have pieces using Bold Linseed for decades ) is yes.
    I do have older pieces treated with Tung Oil that don't appear to gotten substantially darker yet.
    The contention ( but no consensus ) is that such oils vary and some are filtered of substances that darken with age.
    I've been using Teak Oil, but these pieces are not many years oils.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kevin K.
    replied
    Originally posted by Sydney View Post
    RE: Tung Oil: I'd be a bit concerned that Tung OIl would darken over time. I have seen it myself; though it is debated among wood workers ( no surprise ).
    That was one of my concerns about the Tung Oil on the Sapele, it did darken it quite a bit. Would Boiled Linseed Oil do the same?

    Leave a comment:


  • Kevin K.
    replied
    Thanks guys.

    Yea, lots of block sanding Tom. I used a straight angle die grinder with this bit http://www.veneersupplies.com/produc...outer-Bit.html to rough cut the veneer by hand and then finished the rest with the sanding block. Did you ever pick up one of these cutters Tom? Worth their weight in gold if you ask me.

    I've done a little experimenting with the Danish oil Mike but didn't try thinning it, might give that a whirl on some scraps to see how it looks. Thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • Millstonemike
    replied
    Originally posted by tomzarbo View Post
    Kevin, they look amazing. ... Good choice to have the veneer go straight up/down, that looks good. TomZ
    +1. The vertical veneer looks awesome (as does the entire build). Work of this quality transcends anything in the high-end audio store.

    I got good results on natural wood using danish oil thinned 50/50 with mineral spirits; applied using a French polish technique. It was easy but time consuming. But I have nearly zero experience with wood finishing so I can't recommend ...

    Leave a comment:

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