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  • Woofer rubber surround repair....

    So, I was attempting to build a set of LECBOS and discovered that the Peerless 835004 drivers did not store well, and the rubber surrounds have torn. My choices are:
    - buy a rubber surround repair kit that fits these 6.5" Peerless drivers

    - Sustitute Bravox WFR-06BV02B silver cone drivers from my st0ck for the Peerless and figure out a new crossover

    - Buy new Silver Flute 6.5" drivers and figure out a new crossover

    Anybody have experience repairing woofer surrounds? Recommendations?

    Thanks and regards,

    Rob

  • #2
    Originally posted by weinstro View Post
    So, I was attempting to build a set of LECBOS and discovered that the Peerless 835004 drivers did not store well, and the rubber surrounds have torn. My choices are:
    - buy a rubber surround repair kit that fits these 6.5" Peerless drivers

    - Sustitute Bravox WFR-06BV02B silver cone drivers from my st0ck for the Peerless and figure out a new crossover

    - Buy new Silver Flute 6.5" drivers and figure out a new crossover

    Anybody have experience repairing woofer surrounds? Recommendations?

    Thanks and regards,

    Rob
    If it's a small tear, you can repair it. If it is a major tear you might as well forget it, trying to replace an entire rubber surround is not an easy thing to do. I've repaired small tears with black RTV silicone but never attempted to replace an entire rubber surround. Foam surrounds are a bit easier.

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    • #3
      http://www.ebay.com/itm/1-PAIR-PEERL...-/182330557478
      I'm not deaf, I'm just not listening!

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      • #4
        Agreed- a large rip isn't good. A small tear can be fixed with Aileen's Tacky Glue from the back side with a q-tip.
        Later,
        Wolf
        "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
        "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
        "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
        "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

        *InDIYana event website*

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        http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

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        • #5
          Pics would help. With rubber surrounds, there's often enough compliance remaining that, at reasonable levels, you can repair somewhat larger tears than work as well with foam/accordions.

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          • #6
            Hey Buddy:

            ​Although I've never done a rubber surround, I have done a few foam surrounds. All is all it's not that hard. The most important thing is to cut out the dust cap and shim the voice coil so it remains centered. Pretty scary on the first one you do but,,,,, after a couple, you get used to it.

            ​As long as you can find the correct replacement surround, and the proper adhesive, it should work fine. I'm sure you could do it. If you lived closer I'd do it for you! If your hesitant, find the correct surround and glue, ship everything to me and I'll do it for you!

            Mark

            Crap, just clicked on dcibel's link,,,, for 40 bucks,,,,, I'd just buy those. My offer does still stand!
            Last edited by Psycoacoustics; 12-13-2016, 04:36 PM. Reason: clicked on decibel's link

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Psycoacoustics View Post
              Hey Buddy:

              ​Although I've never done a rubber surround, I have done a few foam surrounds. All is all it's not that hard. The most important thing is to cut out the dust cap and shim the voice coil so it remains centered. Pretty scary on the first one you do but,,,,, after a couple, you get used to it.!
              Same experience here...Id like to add... on a Scanspeak 8542 6.5" driver, when replacing the foam surround, I was able to remove the original center cap from the paper-fiber cone (patience with knife) without destroying the cone or cap. That way when the foam is centered, glued and shims removed, you end up with same original cap instead of the cardboard-like center caps included with some kit that don't match...that is in case the looks bother when listening to music with speaker grills removed....

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              • #8

                If it's a small tear, you can repair it. If it is a major tear you might as well forget it, trying to replace an entire rubber surround is not an easy thing to do. I've repaired small tears with black RTV silicone but never attempted to replace an entire rubber surround. Foam surrounds are a bit easier.
                It is a bit deflating. All of them have a tear or crease appearing around the circumference of the roll surround - varies between 20-60%. I already hit them with a bead of black silicone, but I'm not convinced that the repair will be effective. Plus, it looks bad. One of the drivers buzzed loudly upon test - voice coil rub. The hope is that replacing the surrounds would fix the problems, including the off center driver. But this could be a snipe hunt, too, and the repair kits are at least $10 for each speaker. Although I have decent repair skills, this feels like a double-or-nothing gamble. Thanks for the offer for help and the success stories - it pumps up my confidence a bit.

                The cheapest option is to simply park these drivers and dig out the old Bravox speakers, assuming they work and have not suffered the same fate. According to Unibox sims, these would perform better in a larger box (enclosures are already built), but the response is acceptably close to the 835004s. But I can't quite abandon them yet for some reason.

                The other unknown is how the frequency response of the repaired drivers would be affected.

                Note to self: stop buying drivers only to store them, rather than use them. The easiest part of any project is procurement.

                Thanks for listening.

                Regards,

                Rob

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                • #9
                  Weinstro: I'm very surprised that you've had any deterioration of rubber surround. Butyl rubber, the most used rubber I know of used for loudspeaker surrounds, seems to last indefinately [unlike foam]. I've got drivers that are decades old on which the surrounds are 100% fine.

                  That said, it seems that either silicone or butyl rubber itself might help your task. Cartridges of butyl are sold at home improvement/hardware stores along side silicone.

                  Finally, I fully relate to your "Note to self: stop buying drivers only to store them, rather than use them". That's something I've been doing for a long, long time.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by supermike View Post
                    Weinstro: I'm very surprised that you've had any deterioration of rubber surround. Butyl rubber, the most used rubber I know of used for loudspeaker surrounds, seems to last indefinately [unlike foam]. I've got drivers that are decades old on which the surrounds are 100% fine.
                    These sat on a garage shelf in an open package, but not exposed to any sun for ~5-6 years. I agree that they should not have issues. But, they were $10 buyouts and could have been distressed inventory.

                    Originally posted by supermike View Post
                    Finally, I fully relate to your "Note to self: stop buying drivers only to store them, rather than use them". That's something I've been doing for a long, long time.
                    I need either a benevolent drill sergeant or a local chapter of "Drivers Anonymous".


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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by weinstro View Post

                      These sat on a garage shelf in an open package, but not exposed to any sun for ~5-6 years. I agree that they should not have issues. But, they were $10 buyouts and could have been distressed inventory.



                      I need either a benevolent drill sergeant or a local chapter of "Drivers Anonymous".

                      Speakerholics Anonymous.

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                      • #12
                        With a sponsor, that works.

                        I'd settle for a mentor, though.

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