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  • ** Off Topic ** Google Fiber confusion

    I am in no way, shape, or form, a "computer guy", or whatever you want to call it. Could someone please explain to me why I can't get even remotely close to 1000mbps on speed test dot net?


    Last edited by Ray Tremblay; 01-19-2017, 01:23 AM.
    Being defeated is often a temporary condition. Giving up is what makes it permanent.

    Scanspeak Revelator R2904/7000's, Scanspeak Revelator 15M/4531K00's, Scanspeak Revelator 22W/8857T00's, Eminence NSW6021's.
    MiniDSP 4x10HD. ICE Power amplification and an iNuke 3000.

    Sennheiser HD650's powered by TEAC amplification.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Ray Tremblay View Post
    I am in no way, shape, or form, a "computer guy", or whatever you want to call it. Could someone please explain to me why I can't get even remotely close to 1000mbps on speed test dot net?


    If you're having problems or not getting the speed you've,paid for, then you should contact and consult with your ISP.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Ray Tremblay View Post
      I am in no way, shape, or form, a "computer guy", or whatever you want to call it. Could someone please explain to me why I can't get even remotely close to 1000mbps on speed test dot net?
      Some considerations:

      Your dog sled team can only run as fast as the slowest dog, and this analogy applies to computer networks as well.

      Are you running the test through a LAN or wifi connection? If it's a LAN connection, does your switch/router and your laptop/desktop have 1 GB/s ethernet ports? If the cable run is long, are you using Cat 6 ethernet cable? Cat 5e is probably OK for shorter runs. Cat 5 is not rated for 1 GB/s, though. Does the cable/fiber modem have a 1 GB/s ethernet port?

      In my house, I have something like 24 MB/sec from the cable router via AT&T. However, the NAS, switches, wireless router, and some other devices in the house are rated for 1000 MB/sec. That means I can move data around in my own little network at <=1 GB/sec, but when I'm connecting to the big bad internet, it's way slower. As long as it's fast enough to stream from Netflix, it's fine though.

      If you're going through wifi, which networking standard are you using? If you have 802.11ac, the WAP should have MIMO. If it doesn't, consider buying a new wireless router. Both your laptop and your WAP have to support and operate on the same network standard, and not all devices can run 802.11ac as it is fairly new. If you are not on 802.11ac, achieving 1000 MB/sec might be an unrealistic expectation. If you have older devices on your network that run only 802.11b or g (e.g., on old printer), then you need to operate your router as a dual band unit, and peak speed will probably suffer. If you are on wifi at 2.4 GHz, be aware that other networks (SSID's) operating on the same 2.4 GHz channel will slow the network speed for everyone. Also, the bandwidth is only 20/40 MHz at 2.4 GHz. There are free apps you can run which will show you what SSID's and channels are in use nearby. Try switching channels to something less congested, or switching to 5 GHz. Note that range on 5 GHz will be less than on 2.4 GHz. But, on 5 GHz you can double the channel bandwidth to 80 MHz (default is 40). You may need to consider this in order to get to 1000 MB/sec.

      Hope that helps.

      Regards,

      Rob


      Comment


      • #4
        I can stream Netflix at 6 mB/sec easily with no drop outs. Watched a movie about Ginger Backer last night without a hitch.
        Live in Southern N.E.? check out the CT Audio Society web site.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by carlspeak View Post
          I can stream Netflix at 6 mB/sec easily with no drop outs. Watched a movie about Ginger Backer last night without a hitch.
          That is barely enough for HD.

          https://help.netflix.com/en/node/306

          I'd imagine that with any dips in bandwidth, you're probably changing between SD and HD.

          Comment


          • #6
            Weinstro gave a good answer.

            You should be able to run a cable (Cat5e or better), from the broadband modem\router supplied from Google directly to your computer. Make sure your network card supports 1000mbps.

            Run the test again.

            Comment


            • #7
              It is odd that your upload speed is a fair bit higher than download speed, but the numbers are indicative of a wifi connection. If you're not hard-wired to the router, don't expect gigabit rates. These high datarate connections often wont achieve gigabit rates in reality due to data rate limitations implemented on the server-end and in the hops inbetween. However they are good for multiple simultaneous connections of an entire family utilizing internet, games, streaming services, etc.

              I don't know what I'd ever do with a gigabit internet connection. I have the fastest internet available in my area which is 150Mbit/s, and its more that sufficient for everything I do. The longest wait time recently was downloading DOOM, a 60GB game, I waited and hour for it.
              I'm not deaf, I'm just not listening!

              Comment


              • #8
                Like dcibel, I too thought it weird that your upload speed was faster than your download. I have Comcast and I just checked my speed. I use their Wi-Fi modem. My speeds are 180.32 download and 24.26 upload.

                ​1000mbps seems like a lot to ask for, no? What am I missing? Mark

                Comment


                • #9
                  Perhaps he meant 100mbps? Wouldn't be the first time I've seen a isp rip off a customer. My old provider got bought out and all the sudden my bandwidth up and down got reduced. Needless to say they are no longer my provider.

                  Also (pet peeve) I wish they would stop referring to bandwidth as "speed". Should be considered false advertising imo.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by killa View Post
                    Perhaps he meant 100mbps? Wouldn't be the first time I've seen a isp rip off a customer. My old provider got bought out and all the sudden my bandwidth up and down got reduced. Needless to say they are no longer my provider.

                    Also (pet peeve) I wish they would stop referring to bandwidth as "speed". Should be considered false advertising imo.
                    Google Fiber is offered as 100Mbit "basic internet" or gigabit internet.

                    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Fiber
                    I'm not deaf, I'm just not listening!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Just curious, as my internet is advertised as 150Mbit down, 15Mbit up. I ran the test from the OP, and managed 175Mbit down, 16Mbit up at 5:30PM. Happy customer here
                      I'm not deaf, I'm just not listening!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by weinstro View Post

                        Are you running the test through a LAN or wifi connection? If it's a LAN connection, does your switch/router and your laptop/desktop have 1 GB/s ethernet ports? If the cable run is long, are you using Cat 6 ethernet cable? Cat 5e is probably OK for shorter runs. Cat 5 is not rated for 1 GB/s, though. Does the cable/fiber modem have a 1 GB/s ethernet port?

                        In my house, I have something like 24 MB/sec from the cable router via AT&T. However, the NAS, switches, wireless router, and some other devices in the house are rated for 1000 MB/sec. That means I can move data around in my own little network at <=1 GB/sec, but when I'm connecting to the big bad internet, it's way slower. As long as it's fast enough to stream from Netflix, it's fine though.

                        If you're going through wifi, which networking standard are you using? If you have 802.11ac, the WAP should have MIMO. If it doesn't, consider buying a new wireless router. Both your laptop and your WAP have to support and operate on the same network standard, and not all devices can run 802.11ac as it is fairly new. If you are not on 802.11ac, achieving 1000 MB/sec might be an unrealistic expectation. If you have older devices on your network that run only 802.11b or g (e.g., on old printer), then you need to operate your router as a dual band unit, and peak speed will probably suffer. If you are on wifi at 2.4 GHz, be aware that other networks (SSID's) operating on the same 2.4 GHz channel will slow the network speed for everyone. Also, the bandwidth is only 20/40 MHz at 2.4 GHz. There are free apps you can run which will show you what SSID's and channels are in use nearby. Try switching channels to something less congested, or switching to 5 GHz. Note that range on 5 GHz will be less than on 2.4 GHz. But, on 5 GHz you can double the channel bandwidth to 80 MHz (default is 40). You may need to consider this in order to get to 1000 MB/sec.

                        Hope that helps.

                        Regards,

                        Rob

                        Thanks Rob.

                        For clarity, yes, I do have the 1000 mbps or 1 gigabit service.

                        My desktop is on wifi at the moment with an 802.11n USB wifi adapter that is rated up to 300 mbps.

                        I'm considering ordering an 802.11ac dual band width adapter right now. Will this make a difference?
                        Being defeated is often a temporary condition. Giving up is what makes it permanent.

                        Scanspeak Revelator R2904/7000's, Scanspeak Revelator 15M/4531K00's, Scanspeak Revelator 22W/8857T00's, Eminence NSW6021's.
                        MiniDSP 4x10HD. ICE Power amplification and an iNuke 3000.

                        Sennheiser HD650's powered by TEAC amplification.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Ray Tremblay View Post

                          I'm considering ordering an 802.11ac dual band width adapter right now. Will this make a difference?
                          ​According to the chart at this link802.11 version your device uses.
                          2013 - 2014 802.11ac 180 Mbps - 390 Mbps
                          2013 - 2014
                          (high-end gaming PCs only)
                          802.11ac Up to 585 Mbps
                          2012 802.11n 180 Mbps - 270 Mbps
                          2007-2011 802.11n 32-90 Mbps
                          2006 and earlier 802.11b/g 20 Mbps
                          Free Passive Speaker Designer Lite (PSD-Lite) -- http://www.audiodevelopers.com/Softw...Lite/setup.exe

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Wires...use wires, you will not regret it.
                            I'm not deaf, I'm just not listening!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Wow, you guys are lucky! Yesterday we had a new run of coax installed from the cable distribution box outside to the house, and we are now up to 20Mbps. My computer is new, and the WiFi router equipment (excluding Time Warner/Spectrum's cable modem) is brand-new too.

                              Until yesterday, wired directly into the cable modem I was able to reach a blistering 17 Mbps.
                              Bill Schneider
                              -+-+-+-+-
                              www.afterness.com/audio

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