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Pretty Persuasions - InDIY Coax Build Thread

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  • JavadS
    replied
    Originally posted by skatz View Post
    Javad,
    on your XO on the right there are two coils parallelnto each other and fairly close. Why not change the orientation of one to decrease interaction?
    Thanks for the comment, yea I can they are about 4" apart and the response of this crossover is identical regardless of how I orient the coils, I did test it. Thanks!

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  • craigk
    replied
    Javad, is this how your company builds high performance car parts ? Ben's comments matter because somehow people think that parallel parts in a crossover don't contribute to the sound. Everything in the circuit contributes. Your answer is a little arrogant.

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  • skatz
    replied
    Javad,
    on your XO on the right there are two coils parallelnto each other and fairly close. Why not change the orientation of one to decrease interaction?

    Leave a comment:


  • cap
    replied
    Great thread ! As a wood worker of 35 years I can appreciate the skill.. The knowledge of the x overs and such is always cool

    Leave a comment:


  • JavadS
    replied
    Got the crossovers finalized and tested today, I ended up tweaking the lpad once I had components soldered in place on the board.



    I increased R1 to 2 ohms and R3 to 5.6 to get response back to where I wanted it. Basic layout





    And loaded up input and output leads



    Woofer spade terminals



    Mid push terminals



    Binding post input leads





    Thanks!
    Javad

    Leave a comment:


  • JavadS
    replied
    Originally posted by Wolf
    This is AC circuitry, and audiophools don't understand that all parts matter.

    Leave a comment:


  • KEtheredge87
    replied
    Originally posted by wolf View Post
    Be advised- if it's in the circuit, it's in the signal path. This is AC circuitry, and audiophools don't understand that all parts matter.
    Originally posted by craigk View Post

    110 % correct.
    Well then... I shan't be labeled an Audiophool! I'll start looking for some AC circuits and speakers "for dummies" references to bring myself up to speed

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  • craigk
    replied
    Originally posted by Wolf View Post
    Be advised- if it's in the circuit, it's in the signal path. This is AC circuitry, and audiophools don't understand that all parts matter.

    Later,
    Wolf
    110 % correct.

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  • Wolf
    replied
    Be advised- if it's in the circuit, it's in the signal path. This is AC circuitry, and audiophools don't understand that all parts matter.

    Later,
    Wolf

    Leave a comment:


  • KEtheredge87
    replied
    Originally posted by JavadS View Post
    Hey Keith! Only because it’s a series inline component and not a parallel shunt component, I’m not sure if it makes a difference but they were only $25 and they’re fun to hold and look at =)
    Dude... the lightbulb just turned on in my head! I had heard folks talking about components being in the signal path or being a shunt component before, but I hadn't really appreciated the impact that would have! Thanks!

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  • JavadS
    replied
    Originally posted by KEtheredge87
    I see you went for the 90 uF polypropylene cap on the mid section, and used a 150 uF NPE cap for the woofer. Any reason you chose NPE for the woofer besides size / price? I'm still trying to learn when to make the trade-off between component cost and project sound. I know there's loads of opinion posts where folks try to compare NPE to poly caps, so I don't intend to interject one of those discussions here... just curious about your design process. Thanks in advance!

    Leave a comment:


  • KEtheredge87
    replied
    Lookin good bud! I need to get to this stage of my own project to allow enough time for the crossover work. I'm getting more excited every week to hear everyone's designs. I'm especially interested to see how the horn loaded compression drivers do, since I've never messed with them before.

    I see you went for the 90 uF polypropylene cap on the mid section, and used a 150 uF NPE cap for the woofer. Any reason you chose NPE for the woofer besides size / price? I'm still trying to learn when to make the trade-off between component cost and project sound. I know there's loads of opinion posts where folks try to compare NPE to poly caps, so I don't intend to interject one of those discussions here... just curious about your design process. Thanks in advance!

    Leave a comment:


  • JavadS
    replied

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  • JavadS
    replied
    Originally posted by KEtheredge87
    Hey Javad... This question may border on the subjective, but can you help describe "honky" a bit more in this context? I've heard of horn honk before, but never really been able to associate that with a sound. It just makes me think of an old cartoon bicycle horn or something. Thanks! Keith

    Leave a comment:


  • Wolf
    replied
    You're not far off. It adds that honky coloration or 'forced' sound into the lower female register for sure. When I dialed the resistor value down recently on Steve's "Jaws" in the horn's LCR, it was clear that the honk had subsided using Jennifer Warnes.

    Later,
    Wolf

    Leave a comment:

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