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  • Sound Room Walls

    Gentlemen,

    I had the drywall hung in my basement and the wall behind the speakers is shaking with the bass. The vibrations are not audible as far as I can tell. I had to space the stud frame (2X6) 1/2 inch from the cement wall as it is not square. The sheetrock is 5/8 thick, screwed and glued to the studs. My question is, do I need to remove the drywall and glue the studs to the wall to avoid the vibrations, or can I just let it be as the wall is kind of acting as a pseudo-membrane absorber? Another thought would be to use a damping compound (green glue) and place a second layer of sheetrock on the wall.

    Any words of wisdom would be greatly appreciated

  • #2
    The studs should have been glued to the cement walls. That's not the usual procedure with a regular living space, but it is with a media room. Removing the sheet rock now would be a major job, you're probably better off adding a second layer.
    www.billfitzmaurice.com
    www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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    • #3
      Originally posted by billfitzmaurice View Post
      The studs should have been glued to the cement walls. That's not the usual procedure with a regular living space, but it is with a media room. Removing the sheet rock now would be a major job, you're probably better off adding a second layer.
      I like the second drywall layer approach in this case. A layer of "Green glue" in between them should help significantly also.


      Bill - If gluing to the concrete, wouldn't treated lumber be needed? Concrete can "sweat" depending upon the region? Perhaps I am wrong there.

      Would a resilient channel have been a better option here to help reduce sound transmission along with something like Thermafiber mineral wool insulation? I feel like that would have been the proper route.

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      • #4
        Investigate spray in expanding foam insulation.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by anunnaki View Post
          Bill - If gluing to the concrete, wouldn't treated lumber be needed? Concrete can "sweat" depending upon the region? Perhaps I am wrong there.
          The wood wouldn't be in contact with the concrete, the adhesive would. Besides, if the concrete wall is an outer wall or a foundation and you insulate the framed wall the insulation vapor barrier would eliminate condensation.

          www.billfitzmaurice.com
          www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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          • #6
            All of the 2X6 studs are treated. Filling with expanding insulation is impossible as all cavities have 2X6 Rockwool insulation installed. Sound transmission is of no concern as it is a concrete basement wall behind the studded wall. The header and footer are both anchored (bolted) to the floor and side wall. I initially was going to remove the drywall, but I just had my shoulder replaced 6 weeks ago and I just simply don't have the strength to rip the glued drywall from the studs. Looks like some more green glue is called for. Would it be better to use a second layer of 5/8 drywall or use 1/2 inch to have different resonant frequencies?

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            • #7
              Even though glued with greenglue the two layers would operate as one, with a single resonant frequency. Not that it matters, what prevents vibration isn't resonant frequency, it's the combination of mass and stiffness. The resonant frequency is a byproduct of the mass and stiffness.
              www.billfitzmaurice.com
              www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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              • #8
                Out of curiosity, are you running subwoofer(s)? Just wondering what amount of bass we're talking about here. 16" centers I'm guessing?

                Also, I've seen on TV advertisements for a specific kind of drywall that is supposed to be better at noise isolation. I don't know if that would be of any help for you as low bass frequencies are different that general noise abatement.

                You're braver than I for finishing your basement. I always seem to get water in mine somehow sooner or later.

                Good luck. I'd love to hear back on what you did and how it worked.

                TomZ

                Zarbo Audio Projects Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEZ...aFQSTl6NdOwgxQ * 320-641 Amp Review Youtube: https://youtu.be/ugjfcI5p6m0 *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
                *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF

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                • #9
                  I'm still on foam. If you do another drywall layer, put a layer of sheet foam insulation on first. Then you'll have a sandwich construct, much stiffer.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by tomzarbo View Post
                    Out of curiosity, are you running subwoofer(s)? Just wondering what amount of bass we're talking about here. 16" centers I'm guessing?

                    You are correct, All 2X6 studs are 16" on center. The room dimensions seem to dictate multiple subwoofers to deal with standing waves and other acoustical anomalies. The permanent system is not installed yet. I just placed my MacBook downstairs with a preamp/amp combo and an old set of AR speakers I had laying around. I am putting wood flooring (laminate) on all the walls also. If you want, I can post some pictures of the progress

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by kblackmore View Post
                      I am putting wood flooring (laminate) on all the walls also.
                      I don't see that as being acoustically friendly.

                      www.billfitzmaurice.com
                      www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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                      • #12
                        Have you thought about putting some tension on the wall? Drill a 1/2 hole halfway through the stud. Then a 1/4" hole the rest of the way through the stud and a long concrete drill for a pilot hole for a tapcon screw, maybe 4 per stud. You didn't say if you had a vapor barrier on the inside of the concrete. If you don't I would try a hole all the way through the stud and shoot some expanding foam in a can to "glue" the studs to the foundation walls.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by djg View Post
                          Investigate spray in expanding foam insulation.
                          Spray in foam is like Styrofoam ,which is an acoustic amplifier material You’re only limited by your knowledge and persistence to expand your knowledge and to achieve what you want in getting the satisfaction that you made it

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                          • #14
                            You might consider this rather than green glue, https://www.pyroteknc.com/products/d...decidamp-dc30/. You're creating constrained layer damping.

                            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EEh01PX-q9I&t=5s

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                            • #15
                              I went to Carter's Lumber today and found 1X8X16 boards at $10 each. It leads me better to the goal of having wood walls (I want a country look). Forget the laminate flooring and I will do all my walls with those boards over the drywall. I believe that might get me to the stiffness needed. Will order tomorrow for delivery on Friday.

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