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Crossover prototyping system

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  • scholl
    replied
    I use wire nuts. Cryogenically treated carbon fiber with solid gold wire of course. LOL

    Leave a comment:


  • dlneubec
    replied
    I've just used a piece of 3/4 mdf with a bunch of binding posts attached. There are one set of input binding posts and three outputs and then a bunch of binding posts placed around the board in between so you can do as much as a 3-way. I use the outside 2 legs for midrange and tweeter section and the center one for woofer, since the woofer circuit is usually the simplest, at least in a 3-way. I've never had a crossover design that was too complicated to use this on. You can connect parts directly between the binding post openings, or use banana plugs to attach or stack multiple parts between binding posts. Scattered around the board are negative posts that have connections under the board connecting the negative legs. It's probably been used to design a couple dozen speakers over the years and I've never flet the need for anything more complicated.

    Here's a photo:
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  • Wolf
    replied
    Yes- the coil boards are the most cantankerous. I also have these as the main circuit area:
    http://techtalk.parts-express.com/fo...over-proto-jig

    I have several 100W L-pads and rheostats for the resistances on the fly.
    Later,
    Wolf

    Leave a comment:


  • a4eaudio
    replied
    Originally posted by Wolf View Post
    I'm still working on Box of Doom II (1st version was built by Keith Kidder). My box has multiple multi-tapped coils so that I have all of the bases covered. It's been arduous, but it'll come to fruition....Wolf
    So is the idea here that the inductors are the big, heavy, awkward component, so you get all of the bases covered and then it is much easier to drop in the caps and resistors as needed?

    I bought a bunch of those same terminal connectors with the idea of building some kind of prototype tool but they are kind of a pain. Now with DeZZar creating this thread and finding the spring-loaded ones in post #7 I'm freshly motivated to come up with something.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wolf
    replied
    I'm still working on Box of Doom II (1st version was built by Keith Kidder). My box has multiple multi-tapped coils so that I have all of the bases covered. It's been arduous, but it'll come to fruition....

    Click image for larger version

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    Wolf

    Leave a comment:


  • DeZZar
    replied
    Originally posted by a4eaudio View Post
    DeZZar - thanks for posting this. I hope you don't mind me posting some questions here for the forum (let me know if you want me to start a new thread).

    I don't have a 3D printer but I have been trying to build a xo prototype system. Based on DeZZar's post I did some more searching and found some quick-connect spring terminals that might work. I have two questions:
    • If anyone has built something that they think is very effective, will you please post pics?
    • I was going to ask what would be a reasonable layout to accommodate "most" xo prototypes. I was thinking of cutting a relatively large board (mdf or plywood) and putting quick connectors between all of the possible components. However, I had never scrolled down past the woofer and tweeter sections of a 2-way in PCD. There are WAY more series components and parallel legs than I realized when allowing for midrange and even 2.5 way configurations. I guess it is possible to have a HUGE board with a LOT of connectors to replicate pretty much any XO in PCD. I ordered 60 three-pin connectors (pictured below) and 100 two-pin connectors so it is feasible. But keeping it reasonable, what would you do? Is there a layout that would provide reasonable flexibility but not include "legs" that are almost never used. (After seeing the potential complexity, DeZZar's "modular" approach makes quite a bit of sense.)
    I don't know if its practical or even really possible to build a single board that contains all possible scenarios. Chances are you would find yourself still needing to add something custom down the line. This is why went down the simple modular path. Each board represents a single circuit/filter and I can just plug what I need together and can then begin adding the components. Its also really easy to have a second layout of one of the sections to test which can just be swapped with the whole board. For example, two different l-pads to be tested for a tweeter - can either swap the resistors or just setup two boards and swap them over with the rest of the crossover in place.

    If I ever need a filter/circuit that I don't have a board for, its pretty easy to just make up another board and add it to the collection.

    Works for me, perhaps not everyone.

    As suggested earlier by billfitzmaurice you could also substitute my printed terminals with panel mount female banana connectors (the ones shown in the side of my boards) and then use the banana plugs he's linked to mount components. As he pointed out it has the advantage of being stackable.


    Leave a comment:


  • DanP
    replied
    Originally posted by a4eaudio View Post
    DeZZar - thanks for posting this. I hope you don't mind me posting some questions here for the forum (let me know if you want me to start a new thread).

    I don't have a 3D printer but I have been trying to build a xo prototype system. Based on DeZZar's post I did some more searching and found some quick-connect spring terminals that might work. I have two questions:
    • If anyone has built something that they think is very effective, will you please post pics?
    • I was going to ask what would be a reasonable layout to accommodate "most" xo prototypes. I was thinking of cutting a relatively large board (mdf or plywood) and putting quick connectors between all of the possible components. However, I had never scrolled down past the woofer and tweeter sections of a 2-way in PCD. There are WAY more series components and parallel legs than I realized when allowing for midrange and even 2.5 way configurations. I guess it is possible to have a HUGE board with a LOT of connectors to replicate pretty much any XO in PCD. I ordered 60 three-pin connectors (pictured below) and 100 two-pin connectors so it is feasible. But keeping it reasonable, what would you do? Is there a layout that would provide reasonable flexibility but not include "legs" that are almost never used. (After seeing the potential complexity, DeZZar's "modular" approach makes quite a bit of sense.)
    Click image for larger version

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    I went down this rabbit hole years ago and decided that no board was best. It needed to be too big to accommodate all the variables I wanted to include and then would still be limiting. I made some clips like you showed out of buyout spring terminals, which act as 2, 4 and 6 connection nodes. All the nodes I've ever needed fit in a 4" cube box and I have infinite flexibility. Take the 2 and 3 pin connectors you bought and join some of them to be 4 and 6 connectors (for the ground node) and forget the board. Connections will be quick and easy without damaging leads and you'll have all the flexibility you'll ever need.

    Leave a comment:


  • a4eaudio
    replied
    DeZZar - thanks for posting this. I hope you don't mind me posting some questions here for the forum (let me know if you want me to start a new thread).

    I don't have a 3D printer but I have been trying to build a xo prototype system. Based on DeZZar's post I did some more searching and found some quick-connect spring terminals that might work. I have two questions:
    • If anyone has built something that they think is very effective, will you please post pics?
    • I was going to ask what would be a reasonable layout to accommodate "most" xo prototypes. I was thinking of cutting a relatively large board (mdf or plywood) and putting quick connectors between all of the possible components. However, I had never scrolled down past the woofer and tweeter sections of a 2-way in PCD. There are WAY more series components and parallel legs than I realized when allowing for midrange and even 2.5 way configurations. I guess it is possible to have a HUGE board with a LOT of connectors to replicate pretty much any XO in PCD. I ordered 60 three-pin connectors (pictured below) and 100 two-pin connectors so it is feasible. But keeping it reasonable, what would you do? Is there a layout that would provide reasonable flexibility but not include "legs" that are almost never used. (After seeing the potential complexity, DeZZar's "modular" approach makes quite a bit of sense.)
    Click image for larger version

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ID:	1453348

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Circuit Layouts.PNG
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ID:	1453349

    Leave a comment:


  • DeZZar
    replied
    Originally posted by AEIOU View Post
    Nice enclosures. Is that a slot port or some sort of MLTL?
    Thank you. It's a slot port in these ones. Not quite finished, still painting up the plinth.

    Leave a comment:


  • AEIOU
    commented on 's reply
    Nice enclosures. Is that a slot port or some sort of MLTL?

  • AEIOU
    replied
    You could always buy one of these. LOL Vidsonix VCB-100 Virtual Crossover Box

    Click image for larger version

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  • billfitzmaurice
    replied
    I do something similar, using this style of banana plug for all the junctions: https://www.parts-express.com/parts-...-type--091-330
    Connecting wire and component leads to them is fast and easy, and you can stack them end to end.

    Leave a comment:


  • DeZZar
    replied
    File for the caps for each end of the boards attached.
    Attached Files

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  • DeZZar
    replied
    Click image for larger version

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    The text files attached are 3d print (*.STL) files (change the extension). Covers the small and large terminal bases, the terminal top and the caps for each end of the board.

    Hope its useful for someone else.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • DeZZar
    started a topic Crossover prototyping system

    Crossover prototyping system

    Hi All,

    I recently started looking at easier ways to create crossover prototypes. Soldering and un-soldering components was getting old fast and twisting/clipping/clamping things together is just a nightmare. I googled around for any existing systems and couldn't really find anything, particularly not for what I wanted.

    I wanted to be able to breakup a crossover into its individual circuits and have a modular way to assemble a complete crossover. The key issue to solve was to easily hot swap individual components out, or hot swap out an entire section.

    I began looking around for some cost effective terminals exploring spring mounted push type clips, screw terminals etc but the things I found were either stupidly expensive or not really intended for the type of mounting I was looking for.

    In the end I designed my own and printed them using a 3d printer and put together the system I wanted. I thought I would share on here just in case someone else is also interested.

    These are the individual terminals. Printed in two parts and then glued together. Uses M4 bolts. Nutsert set into the bottom of the top half, bolt through the bottom half is then trapped when top/bottom glued together using a little CA glue. Thumb screw or similar in the top. Crossover parts obviously just inserted into the gap and then you tighten the top screw down.

    The bolt through the bottom is an allen key bolt which you can get to when the top bolt is removed to tighten it onto the prototyping board.
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    These are then just mounted to some 3mm mdf board (or ply, or plastic, whatever you like) where each board you make up represents a standard part of a crossover network.

    Here is a low pass section. Only connect the coil for 6db, connect cap for 12db, connect up a second LP board for 18 and 24...you get the idea.
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    Each board can be connected to another via banana connectors. At one end are just panel mount female terminals and standard male terminals at the other.

    Once you create as many boards as you need you simply connect them together like this (which is a tweeter network I'm working on at the moment). Two Hight Pass boards, an L-Pad and Zobel.
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