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How much of a mark up when selling your DIY speakers?

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  • How much of a mark up when selling your DIY speakers?

    Commercial built speakers mark there speakers up anywhere from 2-10 times or higher. How much of a mark up would you charge for your DIY speaker? Parts and Labor? Anything else?

  • #2
    I sell them at cost as I have zero interest in providing anything like a warranty or tech support. Since you do not have brand recognition, you will not be able to charge typical commercial prices for a DIY speaker, even it it represents absolute high end fit and finish and sound quality. It will still just be something you built in your garage.

    Good luck.
    Don't listen to me - I have not sold any $150,000 speakers.

    Comment


    • JRT
      JRT commented
      Editing a comment
      Reminds me of the old joke.

      You can make a small fortune in the loudspeaker business...

      ...if you start with a larger fortune.

    • johnnyrichards
      johnnyrichards commented
      Editing a comment
      That is the truth. There is a secret to success in the world of commercial audio, and it is only nominally related to sound quality, engineering, or innovation in products.

      Someone wiser than me in the ways of business once said "great ideas are the easiest part of running a business".

    • Unbiasedsound
      Unbiasedsound commented
      Editing a comment
      Ah ok Thanks.

  • #3
    Anywhere from -50% to -100%

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    • #4
      Apart from the sound, I think ultimately it has a lot to do with how well you can finish them. The vast majority of diy stuff I see...well...looks DIY....and in my view thats a problem for their commercial viability when they can't hold a candle to the finish of even cheap commercially made speakers.

      If I've been commissioned to make some then it's parts + labour. (But again if you can't make them efficiently, you either end up working for 12 cents an hour or have to try charging a price that just isn't viable). The higher the price, the higher the expectation on the quality of the end product.

      If I'm selling a personal project, a prototype, essentially anything 'used' it's parts cost at best but likely a lot less.

      Comment


      • Unbiasedsound
        Unbiasedsound commented
        Editing a comment
        Typically my DML panels are easy to build as they look like Magnepans with a wooden frame around the panel material. I can stain and varnish the wooden frame to look like a high end finish like on the Maggies.

    • #5
      Every now and then when a "customer" commissions a pair, I may make a couple hundred bucks.
      Most often though I just try to get "cost" out of them so I can keep the "need to build" fulfilled.

      Comment


      • #6
        I just renovated my house and the cost of labor is over 10X that of the materials. I also had a cement tile wall done on my front yard and the materials cost around $600.00 while the labor was $4000.00

        I wish everyone was as generous as some of yawl when it comes to labor cost.

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        • #7
          Originally posted by DeZZar View Post
          Apart from the sound, I think ultimately it has a lot to do with how well you can finish them. The vast majority of diy stuff I see...well...looks DIY....and in my view thats a problem for their commercial viability when they can't hold a candle to the finish of even cheap commercially made speakers.
          Yes

          While I completely lack experience on this matter with speakers, I have a pretty good understanding for woodworking in general.

          There is a very big (and almost no) difference between DIY and Bespoke.

          People highly value well made custom things that have elements that are not commercially available. Noone wants other people's DIY crap. Live edge, solid wood dovetailed casework, etc.. sells because you can't get it at Ikea. But the finishes have to be good. The difference between DIY and Bespoke comes down mostly to design and execution, both come from some guy (or gal) in his shop.

          That said, good Bespoke type stuff typically doesn't have commercial precise finishing, you want it to come across as handmade not machine made. The ratty wood fad (making things out of obviously reclaimed wood) is tangential to this, taking it to the extreme, commercial companies aren't (weren't...) in this space. I've seen some real nice custom made speakers that partook in the ratty wood fad (not my cup of tea, I'm an oil and wax on well sanded walnut kind of guy); I betcha there's a real market for those though, lots of people love that look and you can't go buy speakers like that.

          How to generally apply this concept to speakers? I dunno, but most likely anything with MDF in it will automatically be lumped in with DIY crap. The first lecture of "How to Identify Nice Things 101" is things made with mdf and other particle board are not nice things. Most people know this (big thanks to Ikea on this front). Yes it applies differently to speakers due to material properties, but, importantly, most people DON'T know this. If they want some rectangular MDF speakers, they'll just go to Best Buy.
          Last edited by Waldo; 04-01-2021, 02:31 PM.

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          • #8
            I think you would be lucky to get 50% of your total investment when selling your used DIY speakers.
            I worked for a music store as their electronics tech for 17 yrs. One day the owner offered me two
            large scoops minus drivers. Four 12" woofs and six mid/tweets later they kicked *** as outside
            speakers with a HK PM 660. They got to be too heavy to carry around as the years piled on.
            I decided to sell them and the best I could get was $250 for the pair. Reality bites.

            Comment


            • #9
              It's somewhat of a ported or rear horn design but the "scoop" Is about 5 to 12 inches high and the full width of the bottom
              of the cabinet. They are primarily used for sound reinforcement. The mids and tweets were added to
              make them suitable for hi fi use. Google "Scoops Speaker image". Pictures are better than explaining.

              Comment


              • #10
                Originally posted by Regore View Post
                I think you would be lucky to get 50% of your total investment when selling your used DIY speakers.
                I worked for a music store as their electronics tech for 17 yrs. One day the owner offered me two
                large scoops minus drivers. Four 12" woofs and six mid/tweets later they kicked *** as outside
                speakers with a HK PM 660. They got to be too heavy to carry around as the years piled on.
                I decided to sell them and the best I could get was $250 for the pair. Reality bites.
                I mentioned above I was doing renovations on my home, a couple of the construction workers were eyeing my DML panels and they both asked me about them and one of them said he owned a old pair of Magnepans before so I let them hear my DML panels and both of them were blown away and one of them asked me if he could buy it and I said that is my prototype and I am not sure if I want to sell them and then it got me thinking and I asked him what do you think they are worth and he said they sound better then his old maggies that he use to own so he said around 1-2K.

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