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Brainstorming a driver config for a *very* cheap 10" 3-way retrofit

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  • jim85iroc
    replied
    Today I bought a 3" poster shipping tube and made a 10" port with 2 45 degree cuts so that it could fit in the enclosure. I hot glued the sections in place, then wrapped the joints in more of the asphalt damping. I also bought more bondo that I'll be using to repair the screw holes & dings on the enclosure before re-wrapping them.


    Ports installed facing up in the enclosure.
    ​​

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  • jim85iroc
    replied
    All of my drivers are in as are all of the parts needed for my Soundeasy test jig. Today I removed the original wiring. The entire 3 way crossover consisted of one 6uf cap on the tweeter.



    I added some sound deadening material to the bed risers, then installed them. I used silicone adhesive on the opening face of the riser, and some MDF blocks on the back to wedge them in.




    Next step is to enlarge the tweeter holes to fit the Apex tweeter magnet. In a stroke of good luck, the Apex screw mounts line up perfectly with the original screw holes.

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  • jim85iroc
    replied
    I ordered a set of those Apex tweeters...

    ...aaaaaaand 30 minutes later I got a shipping notice from PE for the peerless tweeters that they just sent me an email for this morning stating that the backorder was extended a month.

    I guess I'll get to try them both!
    Last edited by jim85iroc; 04-27-2021, 10:15 PM.

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  • LIDAR
    commented on 's reply
    No need to get so complex. Stuff the tip pretty tightly. Then the next layer a bit looser. Keep repeating. it more or less holds itself in place.

  • jim85iroc
    commented on 's reply
    not really. I've got a few tweeters, but they're all too small to work with the opening in the front baffle. None of my tweeters will work in a waveguide either, except for my XT19s, but I would rather save those for a project that's a bit higher caliber.

    I do have a pair of small ND16s or ND20s, but I'm hoping to use those in that 3d printed desktop speaker that I've got on the back burner. I think the Apex tweeters will fit the bill nicely here.

  • JRT
    commented on 's reply
    You don't have any suitable tweeters in inventory?

    Nothing left over from various car audio builds?

    Maybe something you could use in a DIY 3D printed waveguide?

  • jim85iroc
    replied
    Not a whole lot of progress to speak of, but things should start moving soon. The parts that I need for my Sound Easy test jig are on the way, and in the meantime I can start on the cabinets. The plan is to take a couple that are solid but need work, fill & smooth all of the divots and holes, then wrap them in new wood grain vinyl. I can also install those bed risers for the mids, use some dowels to brace the cabinets, line them and start putting the drivers in in preparation for test. Should be fun as long as Sound Easy doesn't get the best of me.

    One problem is that the tweeters that I ordered were supposed to be in on April 23, and now they're showing as May 26. Who knows if that will even happen. It might be time to order those Apex tweeters.

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  • jim85iroc
    replied
    I picked up a set of those bed risers on my way home. They're a little larger than what I'd consider ideal, but I think they'll work great.


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  • Drummer
    replied
    What about MDF rings, in varying diameter to make a cone shape with fleece, and fiberglass resin. Wood glue would work for the baffle and the dowel as long as the mating surfaces were left exposed. Drill holes for the wiring, and use silicone to seal. Glenn.

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  • fpitas
    replied
    Originally posted by jim85iroc View Post
    Those bed risers have a lip around the bottom that will be perfect to glue to the baffle, plus a flat spot at the top that you can use to position a dowel between it and the rear wall of the enclosure.
    Well if they're polyethylene you may not get glue to stick. Still you can lay a bead of say, RTV and use a bunch of screws to get it to seal.

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  • jim85iroc
    replied
    Those bed risers have a lip around the bottom that will be perfect to glue to the baffle, plus a flat spot at the top that you can use to position a dowel between it and the rear wall of the enclosure.

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  • LOUT
    commented on 's reply
    Good point. Are there some glues that are pretty known to fail and any cost-effective ones that might still work?

    Maybe some kind of seal (probably spare speaker gasket) and screwing through the plastic lip partway into the back of the baffle with some short, wide-thread woodscrews? Kind of scary compared to glue with the chance of piercing or cracking the baffle if the pilot holes are a little small or something.

  • fpitas
    replied
    How are people holding the mid chamber to the front panel? A lot of common plastic stuff is polyethylene, which is a beast to glue.

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  • jim85iroc
    replied
    Originally posted by LOUT View Post
    Someone here on PETT had a cool idea to use those thick plastic "bed risers" for midwoofer sealing. Probably more likely to see them in a department store or online than a hardware store, but it doesn't hurt to ask wherever you are shopping.

    Hopefully these are okay to link since they aren't a competing product for PE....around $6/4pack:
    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Mainstays...Pack/937595676
    That's an awesome idea! I think I have some around here already. The walls are tapered and there's a flange to mount them with. They're also sturdy enough to accommodate a dowel rod between the back of the mid enclosure and the back wall of the main enclosure. Perfect idea!

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  • Steve Lee
    commented on 's reply
    Cool idea.

    Thanks.
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