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  • Use mic-in as input

    Hello,

    I am trying to capture my electric piano audio with my mobile phones 3.5" input. What i did was use my electric piano's headphones output and connected it directly to my mobile phones 3.5" input. It works, but obviously signal is to strong for the mic input, so there is slight distortion of sorts on stronger notes.

    I am wondering if there is a simple way to reduce the strength of that signal so my mic input could handle it without distortion ? Like, with a resistor ? Or maybe some 3.5" -> 3.5" converter that would do the job for me ?

    I am recording some piano lessons using Samsung galaxy S7 camera. Till now i used external microphone and recorded the sound coming from electric piano's speakers. It worked fine, but sadly that also captures other sounds, like pedal squeaks, dog barking, etc. So i would like to keep all simple as it is, except capture audio directly from my piano. If possible i would like to avoid extra devices involved in recording, like my computer, etc. since its much easier to just have 1 device recording video and audio, so i dont have to deal with editing, syncing, etc. I am not doing any proffesional work, it doesn't have to be perfect.

  • #2
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K8_e...ectronicsNmore

    Found this in the meantime, so i am wondering if this should do the trick ?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by SentinelAeon View Post
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K8_e...ectronicsNmore

      Found this in the meantime, so i am wondering if this should do the trick ?
      Thank you for posting the YouTube link because I'm also interested in doing something similar. I have a lecture on Micro Cassette Tape that I'd like to transfer to my computer, converting it from analog to digital for long term storage and usage. My original thought was to do something similar as in the video, but using a potentiometer rather than fixed resistors. The capacitors are probably not necessary, needed to block DC if there is any, but there shouldn't be any.

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      • #4
        I did the gizmo from the video and tested it. File named default means directly connecting headphones output with microphone input, while modded means there is gizmo with resistors and caps in between. First file is song that was preloaded on my piano by Yamaha and i can play it by pressing a button. Second is me playing a short part of Chopins song. Now, it certanly sounds better with gizmo. But is it just me or is there still some distortion ? And if it is, would using 1000 Ohm resistors instead of 500 Ohm ones help this ? Maybe someone whos more advanced can do some kind of spectral analysis of the clips and tell me if he can see/hear distortion. Anyway, the audio files are very small, i uploaded them to uFile since i cant attach .mp3 or .zip here.

        Click image for larger version  Name:	image_90576.jpg Views:	3 Size:	651.9 KB ID:	1469648
        Browse files uploaded to 1621022335 securely with ufile.io

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by SentinelAeon View Post
          I did the gizmo from the video and tested it. File named default means directly connecting headphones output with microphone input, while modded means there is gizmo with resistors and caps in between. First file is song that was preloaded on my piano by Yamaha and i can play it by pressing a button. Second is me playing a short part of Chopins song. Now, it certanly sounds better with gizmo. But is it just me or is there still some distortion ? And if it is, would using 1000 Ohm resistors instead of 500 Ohm ones help this ? Maybe someone whos more advanced can do some kind of spectral analysis of the clips and tell me if he can see/hear distortion. Anyway, the audio files are very small, i uploaded them to uFile since i cant attach .mp3 or .zip here.

          Click image for larger version Name:	image_90576.jpg Views:	3 Size:	651.9 KB ID:	1469648
          Arbitrarily picking and choosing resistor values (maybe) isn't going to do it. What needs to be figured out is the signal level your cell phone jack can accept, within its specifications. Then build the attenuator accordingly.

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