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Utah Heritage HS1-C

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  • fpitas
    replied
    Originally posted by billfitzmaurice View Post
    I daresay even an off the shelf crossover would be better than that. Increasing the resistance with the pot lowers the knee frequency of the filter cap.
    As a quick and dirty thing to use an off the shelf, I guess one could Zobel the drivers to try to flatten their impedance.

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  • Steve Lee
    replied
    That may have been the design intent, Bill - I mean everybody needs a knob to turn in the audiophile realm . . .

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  • fpitas
    replied
    Originally posted by billfitzmaurice View Post
    I daresay even an off the shelf crossover would be better than that. Increasing the resistance with the pot lowers the knee frequency of the filter cap.
    Maybe that's a high-end feature allowing variable overlap adjustment? Yeah, maybe not

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  • billfitzmaurice
    replied
    I daresay even an off the shelf crossover would be better than that. Increasing the resistance with the pot lowers the knee frequency of the filter cap.

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve Lee
    replied
    Yes, The pot is just a variable resistor sending the 4uf high pass filtered signal to both the mid and tweeter and the tweeter is padded further by the series resistor.

    You can start by jumping across the wiper and high-pass end of the pot and send some audio at low volume to the speaker to verify that the pot is bad or not.

    Leave a comment:


  • fpitas
    replied
    Originally posted by michaelp View Post
    Yes, sounds like I might not have the skills and tools right now to design my own crossover.

    I'm looking at what I think is an L-pad. I'm seeing 2 of the tabs soldered together and connected to the capacitor. Does that mean that this is not actually an L-pad here, but just functioning as a variable resistor? Can I replace it with a fixed resistor?
    Not sure, sorry. It's been years since I used passive parts for speakers. Sounds like it's just a variable resistor, though.

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  • michaelp
    replied
    Yes, sounds like I might not have the skills and tools right now to design my own crossover.

    I'm looking at what I think is an L-pad. I'm seeing 2 of the tabs soldered together and connected to the capacitor. Does that mean that this is not actually an L-pad here, but just functioning as a variable resistor? Can I replace it with a fixed resistor?

    Leave a comment:


  • fpitas
    replied
    You *might* find replacement drivers on eBay. Then, since I very much doubt you'll find the information online, you'll need to measure their frequency response and impedance over frequency. Finally, you can enter those parameters into a SIM.

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  • fpitas
    replied
    If you've never designed crossovers before, you're in for a long ride.

    You *might* find replacement drivers on eBay. Then, since I very much doubt you'll find the information online, you'll need to measure their frequency response and impedance over frequency. Finally, you can enter those parameters into a SIM.

    Leave a comment:


  • michaelp
    started a topic Utah Heritage HS1-C

    Utah Heritage HS1-C

    Does anybody have any experience with vintage Utah Heritage HS1-C speakers? I was given a pair, and one of them has no sound in the mid and tweeter. Seems that the L-pad volume control is burned up.
    I would like to get this working in its original condition to see what they sound like.
    But I am also wondering if it is worth trying to improve them with a better crossover. The crossover in there is really simple/cheap. Any suggestions?
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