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Crossover Help Requested for Paul Carmody's Carrera

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  • mattsk8
    replied
    Originally posted by audiojerry View Post
    No sarcasm was intended, and I have no objection to their continued discussion, but must of it is over my head anyways

    My hesitation with Meniscus assembly is that the components are packed very close together. Is this beneficial or potentially detrimental?
    As stated, as long as the coils are oriented correctly to avoid crosstalk having components close together is perfectly fine. It's actually a goal of mine when I make xovers to pack them as tightly as possible just because I'm a smidge OCD and like things tight and tidy. Have no worries about Meniscus doing your xovers at all, they're definitely experts, very good at what they do. And they're all around great guys too.

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  • Chris Roemer
    replied
    Yup. The only thing really affected by proximity (that can throw values off) are inductors Even those can get pretty close as long as some rules of thumb are followed re: their orientation. (Their magnetic fields can either add or subtract - depending.) Also, if resistors are "marginally" sized (w/respect to wattage) they CAN run pretty hot.

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  • djg
    replied
    RE: tightly packed XOs. Check out some of Wolf's XOs.

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  • djg
    commented on 's reply
    If you ask, I'm sure they would separate the woofer and tweeter XOs on two larger boards.

  • djg
    commented on 's reply
    700uf "flatline" DOA.

  • djg
    commented on 's reply
    There's always tone controls and EQ. Room effects might cause significant shortfalls in your final listening experience.

  • fpitas
    replied
    Originally posted by audiojerry View Post
    No sarcasm was intended, and I have no objection to their continued discussion, but must of it is over my head anyways

    My hesitation with Meniscus assembly is that the components are packed very close together. Is this beneficial or potentially detrimental?
    If you're referring to the assemblies above, they look fine to me.

    Leave a comment:


  • audiojerry
    replied
    Originally posted by mattsk8 View Post

    Not sure if your post here was sarcasm,
    No sarcasm was intended, and I have no objection to their continued discussion, but must of it is over my head anyways

    My hesitation with Meniscus assembly is that the components are packed very close together. Is this beneficial or potentially detrimental?

    Leave a comment:


  • djg
    replied
    Meniscus assembled Continuum XOs. Tape to hide values, it's not a public design.

    Click image for larger version

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  • djg
    commented on 's reply
    Yes, they do. Very neat work.

  • djg
    commented on 's reply
    If you're buying your components from Meniscus, they do a very good job assembling XOs. They can indulge your tastes for however you want it. They assembled my Continuum XOs and I was very happy.

  • mattsk8
    replied
    Originally posted by audiojerry View Post
    Hey Chris and LOUT, I don't mean to interrupt your discussion - please continue, but I wanted to snatch back my post for another question.
    Not sure if your post here was sarcasm, but everything they were discussing is very pertinent to your original question. If you've searched much at all on your query, you know that the "great capacitor debate" is one that has raged on for decades with little to no evidence that suggests much audible difference. I'm not making the statement that "caps don't matter", but I have been in blind A/B comparisons with expensive caps vs cheaper ones. They do sound very mildly different, but one wasn't necessarily "better" sounding.

    All that said, IME the red Audyn caps are great. If I'm spending in an attempt to perfect things, I really like Mundorf Supreme caps. Will Mundorf caps make your speaker vastly superior sounding to the same speaker using Audyn caps? I doubt it but it would be a fun comparison to listen to.

    Leave a comment:


  • mattsk8
    replied
    Originally posted by audiojerry View Post
    Hey Chris and LOUT, I don't mean to interrupt your discussion - please continue, but I wanted to snatch back my post for another question.

    After purchasing the xover components and ofc wire, if I decide not to do it myself, would anyone be willing to offer or recommend someone to assemble it for a fee?
    Fairly sure Meniscus assembles xovers.

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  • mattsk8
    replied
    Originally posted by Chris Roemer View Post
    I THINK "modern" npes are better than the "vintage" ones.

    I re-capped my Dynaco PAT-4 preamp (circa 1973?) after I got my WT3(/DATS) about 10 (or 15?) yrs ago.
    If it had 40 npes in it, a full 25% of them were "far off" spec.
    W/my WT, I could run an impedance sweep (on-screen) and you could see all the "nominal" -looking cap curves, and the BAD ones either ran high, low (sometimes nearly FLAT) or had VERY weird curve shapes. In MY mind, any npe caps from the '70s/'80s PROBably have had about a 25% failure rate (and I'm not talking moderate "drift", either).

    A "good" 700uF curve (below) is the orange, bottom-most one (the bad one looks like a vertical line).
    The pink curve is a good 320uF (6v) - (there's a bad one at the upper right).
    The green curve is a good 50uF, w/a good 5uF above it (yellow line).
    Interesting, thanks for sharing. Do you think modern NPE caps are actually better or was it age that made the vintage caps worse? Short of saving your data and the caps you swapped in for another 45 years there probably isn't a good way to figure that out.

    Leave a comment:


  • fpitas
    replied
    Electrolytic caps in general are far far better than they were even 20 years ago. Their use by the millions in switching power supplies drove research and competition to deliver a long lasting product that is sealed properly and withstands high temperatures. In addition the esr is a fraction of the old vintage values.

    Leave a comment:

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