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Flat Cone Woofer

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  • Flat Cone Woofer

    I have a pair of Phase Tech PC 80s from the last century. The coating on the flat face foam drivers has turned to a powdery mess. I sprayed some clear lacquer to stabilize the mess. Is there anything else I could do?

  • #2
    Not really to me knowledge. When foam surrounds go, there is no repairing them - only replacement. For foam covered cones, I'm not aware of any off-the-shelf recone kits - but you may be able to scrape any remaining foam off of the substrate and re-apply some light foam bought from, say, a hobby store. I have no idea what kind of adhesive etc.
    Don't listen to me - I have not sold any $150,000 speakers.

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    • #3
      If they are what I think they are they are passive radiators. Just a piece of plywood with foam attached for dampening.
      "Every man owes a part of his time and money to the business or industry in which he is engaged.
      No man has a moral right to withhold his support from an organization that is striving to improve conditions within his sphere."
      -Theodore Roosevelt

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ericanderson View Post
        If they are what I think they are they are passive radiators. Just a piece of plywood with foam attached for dampening.
        I dont think so as Phase Technology uses flat cone woofers/drivers for there loudspeakers.

        Review! The Phase Technology PC1.5 Bookshelf Loudspeaker! - YouTube

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Eagleshadow View Post
          I have a pair of Phase Tech PC 80s from the last century. The coating on the flat face foam drivers has turned to a powdery mess. I sprayed some clear lacquer to stabilize the mess. Is there anything else I could do?
          Those old woofers are an unusual design described in the review circa 29 January 1991 at the link below. I think that practicable modest repair attempts on the unusual woofer will excessively change the response. Replacing the woofer with another different woofer requires re-engineering the crossover filters and the tuning of the alignment. Everything has a lifecycle.

          https://www.stereophile.com/standlou...ech/index.html
          "Our Nation’s interests are best served by fostering a peaceful global system comprised
          of interdependent networks of trade, finance, information, law, people and governance."
          - from the October 2007 U.S. Naval capstone doctrine
          A Cooperative Strategy for 21st Century Seapower
          (a lofty notion since removed in the March 2015 revision)

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          • #6
            If I loved the sound I'd try brushing off all the old foam and gluing new pieces on. Yes that's a lot of work, and like JRT alludes to, may change the tuning. So, just like most vintage restorations, it depends on how much work you want to do.
            Francis

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