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  • Too Many Connections?

    I am new as a contributor (sponge, actually) of the forum, but have regularly lurked for over a year. I greatly admire the expertise and information sharing of the contributors. Sometimes even the comedy of disagreements! Thank you for your incredible insights. They are indeed helpful. I am a beginner. Brewed my share of beer over the years (and COVID was a perfect recipe for burnout on that!), but also wanted to build a something with a ribbon/planar tweeter after hearing one several years ago. After a Dayton Planar / Aurum Cantus two-way with a stock crossover last year, you folks gave me the bug about the details I have yet to fully comprehend. Gotta say my first project remains amazing to me and those hearing them, although clearly not worthy of discussion here. We all feel they sound better than by old Energy Veritas which now sit beside them. I'm now a proponent of DIY. So here we go:

    I have the components for a 3 way, including the Dayton DSA270-8, RS52AN-8 and the HiVi RT2C-A. Yes, I have confirmed that I enjoy planar tweeters. For the critics, the Dayton dome mid can be swapped later if/as needed! I have listened. I found some vintage and good looking Pioneer Walnut veneer cabinets (WAF) from the 70's. I will be modifying the rear and front baffles to create the appropriate internal volume and limit resonances. I listen to you! However, I have started with 750/5000 off-the-shelf crossovers. This is just a starting point, as this is my entry into crossover building and I want an experimental starting point for these speakers. I must say, the components sound good in a freestanding environment while I'm breaking them in. I have no measuring equipment yet, but that will follow. Please no grief about that. :<)

    So here's my question:
    Given that I want to experiment with crossover design, I have purchased 3 extra sets of binding posts and a box to hold the external crossovers for each speaker. Two reasons for this: to allow me easy access to modify/replace passive crossovers and easy ability to future employ future electronic/DSP processing. So, are the extra binding post connections and the extra wiring going to be a problem? What do you pros do to allow the opportunity to easily experiment with crossovers without opening and closing the enclosures? I have searched but never found a real answer

    Thanks,
    D. Really, Derek, but that's what my friends have called me for many decades.

  • #2
    Nope, shouldn't be a problem. Well, at least as long as you use 12 gauge wire - then it should be perfect... I regularly leave crossovers out of the box for testing and easy component swaps. Someone I know (who shall not be mentioned) likes to decorate the floor of the entire room with crossover components while he's voicing speakers.. Hahahahah.

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    • #3
      Interesting. I was surprised by the smaller gauge internal wires I have seen in speaker design thus far. Even though not particularly long runs, I have been surprised to see others use smaller gauge wire in speakers, especially for runs to woofers. I do not want to open the whole quality of speaker wire discussion. Lordy, that is a prescription for turning some friends into enemies! However, I did error on the side of gauge overkill in my first set of speakers and figure I'd do a bit of the same this time.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Blenton View Post
        Nope, shouldn't be a problem. Well, at least as long as you use 12 gauge wire - then it should be perfect... I regularly leave crossovers out of the box for testing and easy component swaps. Someone I know (who shall not be mentioned) likes to decorate the floor of the entire room with crossover components while he's voicing speakers.. Hahahahah.
        I know of whom you speak....
        Wolf
        "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
        "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
        "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
        "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

        *InDIYana event website*

        Photobucket pages:
        https://app.photobucket.com/u/wolf_teeth_speaker

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        http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

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        • #5
          I typically have more 12AWG and 14AWG cable on hand than smaller gauges, so probably would use it because its handy, especially from amp to speaker around 8 to 10 ft. But when soldering up the final crossover I typically use 16 AWG. But that is likely overkill, per a quick internet search...

          "With 4-ohm speakers you can run up to 24 feet on 16AWG wire and for runs up to 100 feet, 10 or 12AWG wire is recommended. For 6-ohm speakers 16AWG wire is recommended for runs up to 36 feet and 10 or 12AWG wire for runs up to 150 feet. If you are using 8-ohm speakers, 16 AWG wire is recommended for runs up to 48 feet and 10 or 12AWG wire for runs up to 200 feet. If you are unsure which size cabling is appropriate for your run, it is always safe to use a thicker wire to ensure your speakers are operating at peak performance."

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          • #6
            Thanks. I usually tend to go with overkill with speaker wire gauge, although not by purchasing high-falutin wire which would require a 2nd mortgage.

            Revisiting part of my original question. Without external mounting, what is the norm for allowing access inside the cabinet for the ongoing (post-build) tweaking of crossovers? Screws on the rear baffle or going through the woofer holes seem improbable with many designs, especially some of the beautifully finished cabinets I see.

            D

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            • DeZZar
              DeZZar commented
              Editing a comment
              I just leave all the individual speaker cables running out the binding post holes with a little blu-tac to seal it up. If you are going to be frequently swapping parts there is little point putting everything inside - even if you have a removable rear panel or are willing to keep mounting/un-mounting a woofer.

          • #7
            This is how I prototype/develop crossovers. It's a hot swap setup for components or whole circuits. Not an issue during development. Yes a final version with better parts and without all the connections sounds better but not to the point where you couldn't listen to this for as long as it takes to get the voicing of the system right.

            These are just boards I made representing the various circuit blocks that can go into making up a crossover/filter network.

            Click image for larger version

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            Constructions: Dayton+SB 2-Way v1 | Dayton+SB 2-Way v2 | Fabios (SB Monitors)
            Refurbs: KLH 2 | Rega Ela Mk1

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            • #8
              An alternative to multiple binding posts is a multi-pin Speakon connector. They're available with up to 8 poles::

              https://www.parts-express.com/search...relevance:desc

              That's also a permanent solution if you put the crossover in its own box.
              Francis

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