Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Introducing: The Pit Vipers (Ooh Yeah!!!)

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    This looks like something the DIY community could use! A modern take on the monkey coffin that's not $3K per speaker. Reignite the dorm/garage party speaker.

    What did you do for ports? 2x 2" or 2.5"?

    Now you have me thinking - I have the BC25TG15-04 here from when I built your classix 2.5 years ago, perhaps I could follow along with the DSA315-8's I have here and get some of those new SB12's mentioned earlier and see what I can come up with.

    Comment


    • djg
      djg commented
      Editing a comment
      Johnny Richards came up with a 3 way a few years ago, very inexpensive and very easy, Le Singe Sarcophage if you're looking for a budget 3 way you can build right now.

    • Mainframe
      Mainframe commented
      Editing a comment
      I did see that but remembered it was voiced as in wall so baffle step compensation would be light if any. But yes, that is a nice, simple, veery budget 3 way build. Something in the next budget category is missing, and this pit viper could be the answer.

  • #47
    On the subject of bracing

    As I mentioned earlier, this cabinet definitely needs some bracing. My go-to is usually scraps of MDF, 2-3 inches wide, jammed/glued between walls. So that's basically what I did here.

    I tried to tie in the back walls and the top as well. Could this be improved? Yes! In fact, I invite anyone out there who builds this design to experiment with different ways to give the cabinet some rigidity and raise the resonant frequency. (Or, if you're just good at CAD and want to draw something, I'd be interested to see that, too)

    Here's my basic process for adding bracing:
    1. I knock on the cabinet wall with my knuckles
    2. Then I wedge the piece of MDF in place
    3. I knock again on the cabinet and listen for the pitch to go up.
    4. If I like the spot, I apply some glue on either side and wedge it back in
    5. sometimes I'll shoot a brad nail in from the outside to hold it in place while the glue dries--although that takes some pretty good aim.

    Also, you probably also notice a strip of hardwood around the inner perimeter of the front edge of the cabinet--that's for having something to screw the baffle into. Oak on the top + bottom, and maple on the sides, if anyone cares. Doing a removable baffle is actually a lot of extra steps, and somewhat of a hassle, but it's worth it in the long run as I can keep cutting new baffles to experiment with different driver combos.
    Attached Files
    Isn't it about time we started answering rhetorical questions?

    Paul Carmody's DIY Audio Projects
    Twitter: @undefinition1

    Comment


    • #48
      Originally posted by bassman_soundking View Post

      It looks like the Peerless D27TG35-06
      Correct. And I'm really happy with it in this application. Also, I just noticed that it's seems to be another casualty of slow supply chain. Hopefully more come in stock sooner than later!
      Isn't it about time we started answering rhetorical questions?

      Paul Carmody's DIY Audio Projects
      Twitter: @undefinition1

      Comment


      • #49
        Originally posted by Paul Carmody View Post

        Correct. And I'm really happy with it in this application. Also, I just noticed that it's seems to be another casualty of slow supply chain. Hopefully more come in stock sooner than later!
        Even xo parts seem to be in short supply right now.

        Comment


        • #50
          Originally posted by Paul Carmody View Post

          Correct. And I'm really happy with it in this application. Also, I just noticed that it's seems to be another casualty of slow supply chain. Hopefully more come in stock sooner than later!
          I have never done removable baffles on prior speakers, but I plan to on a current build.
          I just dont know how many screws ( bolts?) to use or proper spacing to keep it from leaking or vibrating.

          Comment


          • #51
            I prefer every 4 inches. YMMV

            Comment


            • Paul Carmody
              Paul Carmody commented
              Editing a comment
              That's a level of patience I'm not sure I possess.

          • #52
            The framing for the removable baffle should help with cabinet rigidity a little

            Comment


            • Paul Carmody
              Paul Carmody commented
              Editing a comment
              You're correct. I was surprised how much it helped cut down on the vibrations. When you think about it, it's essentially battens that are 1/2 glued and 1/2 mechanically fixed.

          • #53
            Despite adding internal bracing, I think the one panel I've neglected is the front baffle.

            In the past I used to just default to double-thick baffle with woofers 8" or larger. But with this particular design I have been making a conscious effort to keep weight down as much as possible. So far, it's a plain rectangular prism, about 70-ish Liters internal volume, using .75" stock all around; about as simple as I can make it.

            But that baffle has a lot of holes in it; and I feel like the 12" woofer is playing it like a piano sound board. Don't get me wrong, I think what I've got here so far sounds pretty darn good and isn't ringing nearly as bad as it used to. But I can't help but think that I won't really know if I've done everything I could, unless I dampen or reinforce the baffle somehow.
            Isn't it about time we started answering rhetorical questions?

            Paul Carmody's DIY Audio Projects
            Twitter: @undefinition1

            Comment


            • #54
              Originally posted by Paul Carmody View Post
              Despite adding internal bracing, I think the one panel I've neglected is the front baffle.

              In the past I used to just default to double-thick baffle with woofers 8" or larger. But with this particular design I have been making a conscious effort to keep weight down as much as possible. So far, it's a plain rectangular prism, about 70-ish Liters internal volume, using .75" stock all around; about as simple as I can make it.

              But that baffle has a lot of holes in it; and I feel like the 12" woofer is playing it like a piano sound board. Don't get me wrong, I think what I've got here so far sounds pretty darn good and isn't ringing nearly as bad as it used to. But I can't help but think that I won't really know if I've done everything I could, unless I dampen or reinforce the baffle somehow.
              Can't you just run a few strips of scrap between the front baffle and rear wall ?
              Even if the front baffle is removable, just attach the strips to the insude of it and let them wedge against the rear wall. Maybe cut them 1/8" or so longer than the actual distance.
              Put some gasket tape or weatherstripping between the baffle frame and baffle to help decouple and seal them as well.

              Comment


              • a4eaudio
                a4eaudio commented
                Editing a comment
                I'd be hesitant to just wedge them in. A modified version of the above...use 4 to 6 one-inch dowels. Using a 1" forstner bit drill a hole about 1/4" deep into the back side of the front baffle, glue (clamp if possible) - they are now a permanent part of the baffle. Make them to 1/32" to 1/16" of the cabinet depth and screw them in from the back.

            • #55
              Hey. Yeah. That explained it much better than I did. I could picture it I'm my head, but had trouble conveying the idea.

              Comment


              • #56
                Why not use 3-4 window braces that can be glued to all four panels, three with screws if you want the front baffle removable. You could cut them just shy of the depth for the front baffle and screw them in.

                Comment


                • #57
                  Hey Paul,
                  Any further progress on this project ?

                  Comment


                  • #58
                    I lifted this from Lunchmoney's Speedster thread. He has the dowels going through the panels, but one could do front to rear braces between the panels at the woofer mount points, and use long wood screws to both mount the woofer and secure the baffle. That should settle things down.

                    Click image for larger version

Name:	speedster brace.jpg
Views:	432
Size:	125.8 KB
ID:	1486838

                    Comment


                    • Paul Carmody
                      Paul Carmody commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Yeah, Lunchmoney's crushing it over there. And yes, I think some sort of dowel "matrix" kinda thing would be the perfect solution for this project. For those who don't do a removable baffle--which I imagine is most people--this would be the way to go.

                  • #59
                    Originally posted by Serenitynow View Post
                    Hey Paul,
                    Any further progress on this project ?
                    I have what I think is a really good crossover going on right now. I'm holding off on making it public because I'm still curious to try it with the Dayton GF180-4. I decided to go ahead and buy a pair of the GF180-4, so they're waiting in my garage. But first I need to buy more wood for the baffles. And since the panels are so big, I need to basically buy the MDF uncut. So that means I gotta bring the minivan. And that means getting my kids' crap out of there... And so on, with more excuses.

                    Anyway, as far as the sound they're putting out, they're really just so pleasing to listen to. I am so happy with the Peerless D27. its response doesn't look that great, but in terms of how it sounds, it's fantastic. The imaging so SO GOOD. And at least on paper, it looks like it can handle a lot of power; so I definitely think it was the right choice in this speaker.

                    The other thing I'm really enjoying is that same phenomenon I had with the Tarkus: low frequency separation. That is, when you have a really large woofer to offload the low frequency musical information from the mids, it creates a sense of separation in the low-frequencies. Like bass guitar and bass drum are clearly two separate entities. And even with the bass drum, you don't just get the attack of the bass drum; you get that big, low timbre as well.

                    As it is, though it's just a really good speaker that like I could easily enjoy for years in my own home, despite its goofy looks. When I started this project, I expected that it would find purpose as a "party" speaker. But it's really better than that. If it was just a party speaker, it wouldn't be so enjoyable across such a wide spectrum of music. And at such a variety of listening levels.

                    Anyway, so far so good, and I really hope you guys like the end result!
                    Isn't it about time we started answering rhetorical questions?

                    Paul Carmody's DIY Audio Projects
                    Twitter: @undefinition1

                    Comment


                    • #60
                      Originally posted by Paul Carmody View Post

                      I have what I think is a really good crossover going on right now. I'm holding off on making it public because I'm still curious to try it with the Dayton GF180-4. I decided to go ahead and buy a pair of the GF180-4, so they're waiting in my garage. But first I need to buy more wood for the baffles. And since the panels are so big, I need to basically buy the MDF uncut. So that means I gotta bring the minivan. And that means getting my kids' crap out of there... And so on, with more excuses.

                      Anyway, as far as the sound they're putting out, they're really just so pleasing to listen to. I am so happy with the Peerless D27. its response doesn't look that great, but in terms of how it sounds, it's fantastic. The imaging so SO GOOD. And at least on paper, it looks like it can handle a lot of power; so I definitely think it was the right choice in this speaker.

                      The other thing I'm really enjoying is that same phenomenon I had with the Tarkus: low frequency separation. That is, when you have a really large woofer to offload the low frequency musical information from the mids, it creates a sense of separation in the low-frequencies. Like bass guitar and bass drum are clearly two separate entities. And even with the bass drum, you don't just get the attack of the bass drum; you get that big, low timbre as well.

                      As it is, though it's just a really good speaker that like I could easily enjoy for years in my own home, despite its goofy looks. When I started this project, I expected that it would find purpose as a "party" speaker. But it's really better than that. If it was just a party speaker, it wouldn't be so enjoyable across such a wide spectrum of music. And at such a variety of listening levels.

                      Anyway, so far so good, and I really hope you guys like the end result!
                      Thank you for the update Paul.

                      I'd like to offer my CNC services for anything that may be useful. I understand that shipping may be cost prohibitive, but just in case, I'd like to help if I can.

                      How do these compare to the Tarkus ?? Was always wanting to build those, but alot of the components are now really hard to come by.

                      Thanks again for everything you do for us mere mortals 😁

                      Todd

                      Comment


                      • Paul Carmody
                        Paul Carmody commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Yeah I could really use a CNC guy right now. Where are you located?
                    Working...
                    X