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Digital Organ Subwoofers

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  • Wolf
    replied
    Originally posted by Keys View Post

    Wolf,

    Hi! I'm near Marion, though I can't claim to be Hoosier born and bred. I moved here when I was 15, and that was a loooong time ago.

    John aka Keys
    There are quite a few of us. Welcome to The Forum.
    Wolf

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  • Keys
    replied
    Ah, another Hoosier! I'm just north of FW myself..
    Wolf,

    Hi! I'm near Marion, though I can't claim to be Hoosier born and bred. I moved here when I was 15, and that was a loooong time ago.

    John aka Keys

    Leave a comment:


  • Wolf
    commented on 's reply
    Ah, another Hoosier! I'm just north of FW myself....

  • djg
    commented on 's reply
    Be aware these forms are approximate dia. They make them in slightly different sizes so they can "nest" 3 or 4 together. Bring a measuring device.

  • Keys
    replied
    THANK YOU, guys for the clarifications. I'll find the 8" forms. I'm about an hour from Ft. Wayne and 90 minutes from Indianapolis. I'll find them and do it right.

    .John

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  • Chris Roemer
    replied
    If you use a FREE box modeler ( like linearteam's WinISD from linearteam.org ) you'll see that Louts ports tune the box to 15Hz. YOUR 1st (16" long) port raises the tuning to 22Hz (about 40% higher) giving a nasty "boom" @ 25Hz (or, MAYbe you could live w/that, it's a +5dB "bump"). Your "8in long" "revision" raises the tuning to 27Hz boosting 30Hz by +8dB.

    Problem is that the output @ 15Hz is then down -18 to -20dB (not what you wanted).
    It's not strictly the port volume that sets the tuning, it's the relationship between it's cross-sectional area and the volume - not the same thing.

    You CAN use a 12" port (and it IS close to the same area as a pair of 8"ers), but it should still be about 3' long.
    Last edited by Chris Roemer; 06-17-2022, 10:06 AM.

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  • djg
    replied
    8" dia. 48" long concrete forms are available in my neighborhood, not too pricey. If you can't find them, make square ports from wood.

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  • Keys
    replied
    Correction

    I just re-read Lout's note. Make that one tube that's 12" wide and 8" long to equal two tubes that are 6" by 36"

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  • Keys
    replied
    Guys,

    I've been thinking I'd use concrete forms for the vent tubes, since they're pretty large, and PVC type tubes that size are pricey.

    Our local building supply doesn't carry forms smaller than 12". Is there a reason not to use one tube that's 12" by 16"? According to my calculations the volume of the tube is the same as two 8" by 36" tubes. I could check other suppliers that are out of town if necessary, but I like to shop locally if at all possible.

    Thank you in advance for your advice.

    John aka Keys

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  • Keys
    replied
    Mr. Fitzmaurice,

    Thank you. That makes perfect sense after you put it in writing. Intuition told me the pipe guy was mistaken, but I didn't have enough background to say why. (I also don't need to lose any friends.)

    I can play the blamed things, but can't always explain exactly how they work beyond the basics.

    John

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  • billfitzmaurice
    commented on 's reply
    He's wrong. He's so wrong that he's got it totally backwards. When the longest room dimension is a half wavelength speaker sensitivity rises as wavelength increases. In a perfectly sealed room sensitivity rises at a rate of 12dB with each octave decrease in frequency. If he was correct headphones and auto sound wouldn't work, let alone single digit home theater. It's also why pro-touring concert sound doesn't even attempt going lower than 35Hz. The room sizes are too large. The reason why pipe organ pipes don't go as low as their length might indicate they should is that their radiating area is too small.

  • wogg
    replied
    Originally posted by Keys View Post
    Mr. Fitzmaurice,
    ...The reason I wondered whether that pitch could be made in the room is because of what a guy who builds pipe organs has told me. He says can rarely get some of those lowest notes to sound if the room isn't big enough. He figures that the lowest note has wavelength of about 68 feet. If no dimension of the room is that long, then the note won't sound. I'm sure home theater folk would dispute that, but it's why I asked.
    ...
    The way the wave works definitely changes, but the sound can still be created. Case in point: headphones create a perception of deep bass with only mm between the driver and your eardrums and car audio easily produces low frequencies way longer than any interior dimension.

    When the wavelength becomes larger than the largest room dimension the physics change. Instead of the wave propagating over distance, the whole room airspace is pressurized so you still feel and / or hear the sound. The acoustics change and you have to deal with standing waves, cancellations, room modes and all that.

    Of course with an actual pipe resonating, the way the sound is created may be a bit different than a moving cone so the pipe organ guy may be absolutely correct in that instance. Not an expert on that at all...

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  • Keys
    replied
    Mr. Fitzmaurice,

    Thank you for responding. I must have misinterpreted your question, reading, "Why wouldn't it be [the first question]?" instead of "Why wouldn't it be [possible to get that pitch in that room]."

    The reason I wondered whether that pitch could be made in the room is because of what a guy who builds pipe organs has told me. He says can rarely get some of those lowest notes to sound if the room isn't big enough. He figures that the lowest note has wavelength of about 68 feet. If no dimension of the room is that long, then the note won't sound. I'm sure home theater folk would dispute that, but it's why I asked.

    Of course, with pipes that size--16' if a stopped pipe and 32' if an open pipe for a single note--they have to go where they will physically fit and not where the optimum place is. They decrease in length geometrically to half that length by the next octave, but that's still a lot of real estate, especially since the longer the pipe the wider it has to be to keep the same tone quality.

    You have a very interesting web site and forum. If these cabinets weren't already made, and if I were the kind of woodworker my father was, I'd build a tuba instead.

    Thank you for sharing your expertise.

    Blessings on thee, sir.


    John Maher

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  • Chris Roemer
    replied
    LOUT's numbers seem valid.
    Bill will tell you that you're better off using 2 different boxes, positioned to fill in each other's nulls.

    One UM18 in a 17cf box using a pair of 6"id x 3' long vents will give similar tuning and results (F3 of 14Hz).

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  • djg
    replied
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F9r9G0CS0BM

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