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One more reason you need a speaker tester.

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  • One more reason you need a speaker tester.

    I received a pair of RST28A-4 yesterday from a DIY guy that didn't like them. They looked new in the box but showed signs of being mounted. I measured the impedance of both. (See comments for the screen shot) and one was definitely not right. The other is right one spec. These have replaceable moving parts so I took it apart today to see if I could see what the issue was. I am sure everyone can see what is wrong by the picture.

    This is not a shot at PE. They are mass producing a high end product at an affordable price. Not evey unit can be hand built and tested without a price tag to match.

    A DATS system or a LIMP jig will make sure you have speakers the are in spec. Allow better box tuning and error checking. Well worth the money or time to build a jig for any speaker builder.

  • #2
    There’s nothing like buying a Dayton product to do QC on your other Dayton products ;)
    I'm not deaf, I'm just not listening!

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    • duanebro
      duanebro commented
      Editing a comment
      I use a LIMP jig I built with stuff I had laying around.

  • #3
    Yellow is the good tweeter. Green is the defective one.
    Attached Files

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    • #4
      I've found some bad diaphragms audibly.. Not quite as bad as yours, but slight distortion that I could only hear on certain songs with certain voices/instruments. One I could see the VC was actually dented in slightly when I took it out.

      I more recently did the same as you for some b-52 buyout tweeters I got off the popular auction site. Built a LIMP box and actually was able to match them better by having LIMP run for a while as I moved the diaphragm in different positions, watching the curve change. Of the 4 tweets I think one or two I actually needed to drill out the indexing holes in the diaphragm bracket so I could orient the coil better in the gap. Once I found the best orientation the waveguide would get screwed down to lock it all in place.

      That is why I am very leery of tweeters without replaceable diaphragms. Because my projects always end up on the back burner periodically and never end up testing stuff soon enough. If you can't fix it yourself you are at the mercy of whoever was doing the gluing that day.

      Comment


      • duanebro
        duanebro commented
        Editing a comment
        I always test speakers when I get them. Super easy and doesn't annoy family like frequency response tests do.

    • #5
      Am I seeing that right... it looks like some of the voice coil windings on the right side aren't even on the former? How did it even stay together before they applied glue on it?

      Interesting, though. Thanks for posting that.

      TomZ
      Zarbo Audio Projects Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEZ...aFQSTl6NdOwgxQ * 320-641 Amp Review Youtube: https://youtu.be/ugjfcI5p6m0 *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
      *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF

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      • #6
        Originally posted by tomzarbo View Post
        Am I seeing that right... it looks like some of the voice coil windings on the right side aren't even on the former? How did it even stay together before they applied glue on it?

        Interesting, though. Thanks for posting that.

        TomZ
        Not seeing it right. Everything is glued well. The tweeter has a large surround you can't see in the picture. The right side is in the correct spot as far as I can tell.

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