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  • 31,500

    The average number of table saw injuries each year in this country.
    I know we've talked about it before, but I just came across this statistic again while reading the most recent issue of DISCOVER magazine.
    Details here at Consumer Reports.
    http://blogs.consumerreports.org/saf...of-trauma.html

  • #2
    Re: 31,500

    Just under the total number of threads in this forum, 32,723 presently....

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: 31,500

      In other words...don't stick your fingers were they don't belong:rolleyes:

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      • #4
        Re: 31,500

        Originally posted by jerryanderson View Post
        In other words...don't stick your fingers were they don't belong:rolleyes:
        Good advice for EVERY area of life!
        Zarbo Audio Projects Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEZ...aFQSTl6NdOwgxQ * 320-641 Amp Review Youtube: https://youtu.be/ugjfcI5p6m0 *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
        *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF

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        • #5
          Re: 31,500

          Use those push sticks!!

          Who cares it those get sliced up if something slips!

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          • #6
            Re: 31,500

            I'd be curious to see what percentage of those injuries are from people who consider themselves experienced woodworkers vs. those who consider themselves beginners. I'd bet it would be grossly lopsided.

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            • #7
              Re: 31,500

              Accidents happen when people become complacent when using power tools in their shops. Improper work techniques/ operations and bypassing the power tools safety features are another cause too.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: 31,500

                You guys have a point. My father-in-law cut his thumb to the bone because he got complacent after years of woodworking.

                I found myself moving a little too quickly on my last project, luckily it was only the sliding miter fence that got damaged and not my thumb behind it.

                Know where your fingers are!

                -David

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                • #9
                  Re: 31,500

                  Years ago I read in one of the woodworking magazines that a large percentage of people who had injured themselves with power tools had thought, right before the accident, something along the lines of "this is something I shouldn't be doing". Ever since I read that, when I'm using any potentially dangerous tool, I try to keep aware of what my subconscious is telling me, and I have stopped a number of times, and either checked my setup, or taken a break and come back fresher. I don't know if it has actually saved me from an injury, but it does seem to be a common sense approach.
                  It is estimated that one percent of the general population are psychopaths - New Criminologist: Understanding Psychopaths

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                  • #10
                    Re: 31,500

                    This is the kind of thing that makes you wish you'd paid a little more and got a SawStop. If you've never seen their "Hotdog" demo video, you should.
                    They use a hotdog to simulate a finger touching the blade.
                    In a fraction of a second, the blade is stopped and dropped below the table's surface.
                    It happens so fast, it is like an explosion.
                    The blade is ruined, but blades are easier to replace than fingers.
                    The testimonials from users are things like they had a minor cut, no big deal, rather than a severed finger.

                    You guys are right about complacency being the major issue, but of course anyone can have an accident.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: 31,500

                      Originally posted by robertclark View Post
                      Accidents happen when people become complacent when using power tools in their shops. Improper work techniques/ operations and bypassing the power tools safety features are another cause too.
                      +1. Plenty of accidents happen to woodworkers who have been using their tools for decades. (I don't have statistics, but you certainly hear stories of people at all experience levels having accidents).

                      If I were in the market for a table saw, I would seriously consider spending the extra money for a SawStop. Also, the newest generation of saws from several manufacturers are finally coming with riving knives, which are reportedly much better than the old splitters/antikickback pawls at reducing kickback.

                      Jim S.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: 31,500

                        Originally posted by Ryan_M View Post
                        I'd be curious to see what percentage of those injuries are from people who consider themselves experienced woodworkers vs. those who consider themselves beginners. I'd bet it would be grossly lopsided.
                        I am a pro and I always pay attention to what I am doing because all it takes is 1 mistake. Part of the job is to think about how to cut and with what blade. Having said all that, my friend with about 20 years behind the belt, almost lost 2 fingers because he didn't put ripping blade and had a bind with kickback in the end of the cut.
                        Stop Saw is very good. The danger is that you get use to the safety factor but there are other tools in the shop. No mater the Saw Stop, pay attention to what you doing and don't work if you are tiered. Basic ideas.
                        http://www.diy-ny.com/

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                        • #13
                          Re: 31,500

                          Overcoming complacency is the major key to safety. My nastiest "bites" have come from screwdrivers, hammers, and a small, toy-like, battery powered trim saw that I was having a little too much fun using. Luckily, no injuries that couldn't be fixed with some band aids or paper towel wads and electrical tape.

                          Maybe it's a little unfair to just focus on table saws because they're probably the safest tool to use for many jobs. You can increase safety even more if you make/buy featherboards, pushsticks, stopblocks, in/outfeed tables, and panel cutting sleds and using them when needed.

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                          • #14
                            Re: 31,500

                            Originally posted by mattk View Post
                            Years ago I read in one of the woodworking magazines that a large percentage of people who had injured themselves with power tools had thought, right before the accident, something along the lines of "this is something I shouldn't be doing". Ever since I read that, when I'm using any potentially dangerous tool, I try to keep aware of what my subconscious is telling me, and I have stopped a number of times, and either checked my setup, or taken a break and come back fresher. I don't know if it has actually saved me from an injury, but it does seem to be a common sense approach.
                            Interestingly, I was just talking to a friend yesterday and he mentioned that one time when he was cutting aluminum castings on a bandsaw he noticed that his thumb was a little bit too close to the blade and where it shouldn't have been. About a second later the bandsaw blade broke and sliced through his thumb up to the bone. It wasn't a serious injury and he healed up OK, but he realized that he should have listened to his intuition. Some hunches are worth paying attention to.

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                            • #15
                              Re: 31,500

                              I never thought I would get so comfortable around moving sharp blades myself, but I ended up a statistic last year for this very reason. Shoved my right middle finger into my Bosche table saw blade, about a 1/3", down to the bone. Actually, it did not even hurt as much as a paper cut when it actually happened to be honest, though it was a bloody mess and took two months before I could fingerpick my guitar again. It healed up so well, though, you have a hard time even finding a scar. I could have easily lost my finger or even two in that accident, so it did scare the mess out of me.

                              -Chris

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