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  • Ryobi dust storm *PIC*



    Provided Link: my site


    I bought one of these little Ryobi sanders the other day. It works great, however, the dust collector seems to be really ineffective. I'm sanding pine. After a few minutes, the dust just seems to fly through the filter and the filter never seems to fill up, probably because it's not catching anything. This is with 150 grit paper.

    Any tips?

    Dave

  • #2
    Re: Ryobi dust storm


    > Any tips?

    > Dave

    I was able to connect my shop vac directly to my Black & Decker sander using the small diameter hose that came with it. The dust collector was useless.

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    • #3
      Go

      > I was able to connect my shop vac directly
      > to my Black & Decker sander using the
      > small diameter hose that came with it. The
      > dust collector was useless.

      Excellent advice. Until yuou start spending big bucks on such sanders and hand tools, the dust "collector/filter" thingies are abou tuseless if you ask me. If the shop vac option is not a good one for your particular situation, I also have another method I use sometimes. I simply place a box fan very close to the work space and face it in the opposite direction, blowing out the garage door. Of course, if opening the garage door or the likes is not an otion, get a cheap 20x20 filter from Wally World and tape it the fan. I used this set-up in an old farm house we lived in on a dirt road. Between that and the main central air filter, dust was really kept to a minimum in the house. Good luck and keep us posted...

      Noidster


      ________
      Sunset Boulevard Residence Prathumnak
      Last edited by thenoid; 08-31-2011, 12:48 PM.

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      • #4
        Re: Ryobi dust storm


        I use the shopvac option. Works great.

        Hong

        Some people are addicted to Vicodin. I'm addicted to speaker building.

        The Chorales - Usher 8945A/Vifa XT25TG Build
        ESP Project 101 Lateral MOSFET Amplifier
        LM4780 Parallel Chipamp
        Sonata Soundbar Project
        The Renditions - Active/Passive Towers

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        • #5
          Re: Ryobi dust storm


          Never tried it before, but I had a couple ideas.

          You might try stuffing your filter bag.

          Another thought I had was dampening the bag before you start. It may dry out and start leaking again or maybe not.

          Along the same lines, a light coat of wd40 on the inside of the bag also might work.

          My thought on the last two was along the lines of the old-type oiled filters or a K&N. The moisture or oil allows the initial dust to accumulate on the surface therefore creating a finer filter for the later dust. In other words, your dust becomes your filter.

          Just some ideas... YMMV

          bb

          > I bought one of these little Ryobi sanders
          > the other day. It works great, however, the
          > dust collector seems to be really
          > ineffective. I'm sanding pine. After a few
          > minutes, the dust just seems to fly through
          > the filter and the filter never seems to
          > fill up, probably because it's not catching
          > anything. This is with 150 grit paper.

          > Any tips?

          > Dave


          Since we cannot know all that there is to be known about anything, we ought to know a little about everything.
          - Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

          Comment


          • #6
            Go

            The moisture or oil allows the initial
            > dust to accumulate on the surface therefore
            > creating a finer filter for the later dust.
            > In other words, your dust becomes your
            > filter.

            It's called a "dust cake" and is part of the design of some dust collectors -- but it cuts your airflow way down.

            ________
            Buy bubblers
            Last edited by mikec; 08-25-2011, 12:59 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Prefer German Chocolate ty *NM*




              Since we cannot know all that there is to be known about anything, we ought to know a little about everything.
              - Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Ryobi dust storm


                > I bought one of these little Ryobi sanders
                > the other day. It works great, however, the
                > dust collector seems to be really
                > ineffective. I'm sanding pine. After a few
                > minutes, the dust just seems to fly through
                > the filter and the filter never seems to
                > fill up, probably because it's not catching
                > anything. This is with 150 grit paper.

                > Any tips?

                I've owned many sanders, different brands - none of them have effective dust control. A vaccum system is a must. A good cheap entry is the ShopVac Hang Up Pro. I still prefer this for my smaller tools to avoid changing connections on the Jet canister/bag dust collector I use for bigger tools.

                I've been using the little ShopVac for three years now and keep wondering why the motor hasn't burned out yet. It hasn't been uncommon to run it for an hour at a time - and I'm sure they didn't build it with that kind of shop use in mind. I've even used it attached to a planer and table saw w/2" hose prior to getting the Jet.

                It's small size gives it convenient portability and wall mount storage keeps it from hogging precious garage shop real estate. It's drawback is small canister and filter, requiring frequent cleaning. I now use the Jet to clean the filter and empty the canister - but used to beat the dust off the filter on the street curb (seems like a back-in-the-day story now).

                At about $75 on the internet, it's a good first vac when you'd rather spend your money on "real" tools - and will still complement a dust collector in the future. The funny thing is that when you finally do upgrade to a dust collector like a Jet, Delta, etc., - it seems to become your favorite tool of all.

                Incidentally, I have a nice DeWalt finishing sander that I've stopped using because the odd shaped dust port does not allow attachment of a vacuum hose. Hmm - guess it's now finally collecting dust. ;o)


                Comment


                • #9
                  Gotta agree on the dust collector


                  I got a real dust collector a bit over a year ago. I don't know how I ever worked without one. Dust collectors are very inexpensive compared to doctor bills for lung damage.

                  I have a 2-1/2" shop vac hose coupled to the dust collector plumbing. It hooks directly to my Ridgid disc sander. I'd say 98%, maybe more, of the sanding dust gets picked up by the vacuum system.

                  Best regards,
                  Bill

                  > I've owned many sanders, different brands -
                  > none of them have effective dust control. A
                  > vaccum system is a must. A good cheap entry
                  > is the ShopVac Hang Up Pro. I still prefer
                  > this for my smaller tools to avoid changing
                  > connections on the Jet canister/bag dust
                  > collector I use for bigger tools.

                  > I've been using the little ShopVac for three
                  > years now and keep wondering why the motor
                  > hasn't burned out yet. It hasn't been
                  > uncommon to run it for an hour at a time -
                  > and I'm sure they didn't build it with that
                  > kind of shop use in mind. I've even used it
                  > attached to a planer and table saw w/2"
                  > hose prior to getting the Jet.

                  > It's small size gives it convenient
                  > portability and wall mount storage keeps it
                  > from hogging precious garage shop real
                  > estate. It's drawback is small canister and
                  > filter, requiring frequent cleaning. I now
                  > use the Jet to clean the filter and empty
                  > the canister - but used to beat the dust off
                  > the filter on the street curb (seems like a
                  > back-in-the-day story now).

                  > At about $75 on the internet, it's a good
                  > first vac when you'd rather spend your money
                  > on "real" tools - and will still
                  > complement a dust collector in the future.
                  > The funny thing is that when you finally do
                  > upgrade to a dust collector like a Jet,
                  > Delta, etc., - it seems to become your
                  > favorite tool of all.

                  > Incidentally, I have a nice DeWalt finishing
                  > sander that I've stopped using because the
                  > odd shaped dust port does not allow
                  > attachment of a vacuum hose. Hmm - guess
                  > it's now finally collecting dust. ;o)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Gotta agree on the dust collector


                    > I got a real dust collector a bit over a
                    > year ago. I don't know how I ever worked
                    > without one. Dust collectors are very
                    > inexpensive compared to doctor bills for
                    > lung damage.

                    > I have a 2-1/2" shop vac hose coupled
                    > to the dust collector plumbing. It hooks
                    > directly to my Ridgid disc sander. I'd say
                    > 98%, maybe more, of the sanding dust gets
                    > picked up by the vacuum system.

                    > Best regards,
                    > Bill
                    Ive got a makita disc sander and I hook it to my rigid shop vac with a large diameter hose. Have sanded indoors with it and the difference is noticable. I've found a big difference in the 6.5 peak horsepower rigid vac and anything shopvac makes.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Gotta agree on the dust collector


                      > Ive got a makita disc sander and I hook it
                      > to my rigid shop vac with a large diameter
                      > hose. Have sanded indoors with it and the
                      > difference is noticable. I've found a big
                      > difference in the 6.5 peak horsepower rigid
                      > vac and anything shopvac makes.
                      I've managed to rig a collector to to my table saw Saturday and was going to try it out today. 18" of snow changed that!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Big coffee filter lining the bag *NM*



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                        • #13
                          Why?


                          > I've managed to rig a collector to to my
                          > table saw Saturday and was going to try it
                          > out today. 18" of snow changed that!

                          My saw's in the basement. Snow days are always good for woodworking, unless you've run out of wood. Or were you out shoveling?

                          Best regards,
                          Bill

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Thanks for the ideas...


                            The vacuum system idea does seem like it would work very effectively. A bit awkward, but maybe if I got a long flexible hose for my Sears Shop Vac, it could be easy. In my situation, I was using the sander on a handrail facia board for the stairs I'm working on. So I'd have to drag the vacuum up the stairs with me...

                            My vacuum is pretty old. And very noisy. Maybe time to get something newer. And, since I'm working on this house addition project, any and all tools are subject to being bought! (So far I've gotten a power nailer, an airless paint sprayer, a set of foldable saw horses, and the sander. Still need to get a Sawsall -- before I don't need it for the project anymore, doh!)

                            dave

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Why?


                              > My saw's in the basement. Snow days are
                              > always good for woodworking, unless you've
                              > run out of wood. Or were you out shoveling?

                              > Best regards,
                              > Bill
                              Yes I was shoveling and did'nt feel like shoveling to my little workshop(100ft or so).

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