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  • how would you make this cutout?

    i need to make a through hole and also a recess for this speaker terminal in a piece of mdf thats 7.5" wide x 20" high, and despite having a decent amount of tools/accessories at my disposal, and a decent amount of woodworking experience, i can't, for the life of me, come up with a method that will be both accurate, and relatively easy (ie. not involve building a dedicated jig).

    obviously i plan to use a router for the recess. and either a router or jigsaw for the through hole. i could spend a day and a half describing all the ways i've thought of and why they won't work (and/or be accurate enough), but there's a good chance no one would read through all that, so i figured i'd just leave it at: what are your suggestions/tips/tricks/methods for cutting a really precise rectangle and it's recess, in a relatively narrow piece of work like this?

  • #2
    Re: how would you make this cutout?

    Well you mention NOT wanting to make a jig to do this but I think you might have to, to make it accurate and pretty but it'd be a real simple 'jig'. Use some scraps to make a piece with a rectangle hole the size of the cutout you need. Cut the bulk of the material out of the board with a jig saw then place the jig on top and use a flush trim bit to clean up the hole. Hold the jig in place by either clamps or friction tape. Then to make the recess I'd use a rabbeting bit - of course you'd want to make the size of the cutout jive with the rabbeting bit so your recess matches the flange on the terminal cup.

    Here's a jig I made. Not all of it really applies but you can see what I mean about using scraps to make a nice rectangle for the flush trim bit. Making the jig for that build could be considered a waste of time but I've used it since too so I'm glad I made it.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: how would you make this cutout?

      Use this

      http://www.mobilesolutions-usa.com/s...RouterTool.htm

      Well actually, I kind of jumped on the guy in the saw thread that recommended a Festool, so any grief about the $220 price tag is deserved.

      While you may not spring for that, I bet you could make you own from scraps that works for the terminal piece, and then use a pattern bit in your router to make the recess. Then you could use a jigsaw to make the through cut as it does not need to be as precise.

      The steps would be as follows:
      1. Use the scraps to create a rectangle that is tight around the terminal piece. (Mdf scraps and super glue work nicely and quickly
      2. Select a pattern router bit with similar radius as the corner of the terminal
      3. Place pattern on the workpiece with either brads or 2-side tape and route the recess using the pattern as the fence for the pattern bit bearing
      4. Size and cut through hole with jigsaw

      Hope this helps

      James


      Edit: Sorry to say the same thing Ryan, you posted while I was writing

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: how would you make this cutout?

        Originally posted by Ryan_M View Post
        Well you mention NOT wanting to make a jig to do this but I think you might have to, to make it accurate and pretty but it'd be a real simple 'jig'. Use some scraps to make a piece with a rectangle hole the size of the cutout you need. Cut the bulk of the material out of the board with a jig saw then place the jig on top and use a flush trim bit to clean up the hole. Hold the jig in place by either clamps or friction tape. Then to make the recess I'd use a rabbeting bit - of course you'd want to make the size of the cutout jive with the rabbeting bit so your recess matches the flange on the terminal cup.

        Here's a jig I made. Not all of it really applies but you can see what I mean about using scraps to make a nice rectangle for the flush trim bit. Making the jig for that build could be considered a waste of time but I've used it since too so I'm glad I made it.
        You could draw it out on the enclosure with a pencil and then use your router against a clamped straight edge. Or use something like this:
        Attached Files

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: how would you make this cutout?

          Originally posted by Ryan_M View Post
          Well you mention NOT wanting to make a jig to do this but I think you might have to, to make it accurate and pretty but it'd be a real simple 'jig'. Use some scraps to make a piece with a rectangle hole the size of the cutout you need. Cut the bulk of the material out of the board with a jig saw then place the jig on top and use a flush trim bit to clean up the hole. Hold the jig in place by either clamps or friction tape. Then to make the recess I'd use a rabbeting bit - of course you'd want to make the size of the cutout jive with the rabbeting bit so your recess matches the flange on the terminal cup.

          Here's a jig I made. Not all of it really applies but you can see what I mean about using scraps to make a nice rectangle for the flush trim bit. Making the jig for that build could be considered a waste of time but I've used it since too so I'm glad I made it.
          that's pretty nifty. nice work on that. the template/flush trim type of thing was one of my first thoughts, but i hadn't thought of doing it by gluing 4 separate boards together. i was thinking of cutting a hole in a single board, which left me with the catch 22 of "if i can cut the rectangle in my template precisely enough to have the template be usable, i wouldn't need the template in the first place".

          as far as doing the recess with a rabbetting bit, unfortunately thats a no go. whatever genius designed this terminal gave it different sized overhangs on the top/bottom than on the sides. also, the radius on the corners is pretty tight (~1/4"), where as the overhangs (and therefore what the rabbet would need to be) are much bigger. bigger rabbet = bigger radius = no dice.

          this is good though. not necessarily a spot on solution to my exact situation, but some ideas to get me out of my tunnelvision, and get me thinking outside the box. keep em comin!

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: how would you make this cutout?

            Originally posted by absolootbs View Post
            as far as doing the recess with a rabbetting bit, unfortunately thats a no go. whatever genius designed this terminal gave it different sized overhangs on the top/bottom than on the sides. also, the radius on the corners is pretty tight (~1/4"), where as the overhangs (and therefore what the rabbet would need to be) are much bigger. bigger rabbet = bigger radius = no dice.

            this is good though. not necessarily a spot on solution to my exact situation, but some ideas to get me out of my tunnelvision, and get me thinking outside the box. keep em comin!
            If that's the case then a possible solution is to make two templates like the one I did - one for the cutout and one for the recess. Use the recess one with a template guide like jimlg mentioned, the cutout could be done the same way too. Or just one template for the recess/flange and then just jig saw out the center for the cutout.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: how would you make this cutout?

              Originally posted by jimlg View Post
              Use this

              http://www.mobilesolutions-usa.com/s...RouterTool.htm

              Well actually, I kind of jumped on the guy in the saw thread that recommended a Festool, so any grief about the $220 price tag is deserved.

              While you may not spring for that, I bet you could make you own from scraps that works for the terminal piece, and then use a pattern bit in your router to make the recess. Then you could use a jigsaw to make the through cut as it does not need to be as precise.

              The steps would be as follows:
              1. Use the scraps to create a rectangle that is tight around the terminal piece. (Mdf scraps and super glue work nicely and quickly
              2. Select a pattern router bit with similar radius as the corner of the terminal
              3. Place pattern on the workpiece with either brads or 2-side tape and route the recess using the pattern as the fence for the pattern bit bearing
              4. Size and cut through hole with jigsaw

              Hope this helps

              James


              Edit: Sorry to say the same thing Ryan, you posted while I was writing
              thats pretty much the exact thing i was picturing in my mind that would work perfectly. but wow, yea, $220 ain't happenin.

              out of all the router bits i've inherited and amassed, of course none of them are top bearing pattern bits. but being that i do, and will continue doing, other woodworking projects in addition to speaker building, i'm sure getting one certainly wouldn't be a bad purchase. and using this type of template, rather than one that goes around the outside of the router base itself would solve the problem created by the work piece being so narrow that the base of the router (and therefore, that kind of template) hangs off the sides and can't be clamped.

              i think the double sided tape is a good idea too. one of the problems i was having was being able to clamp things everywhere i needed too. my work bench is far bigger than my work piece, so i could never clamp things on more than two sides at a time. only concern is how cleanly the double sided tap removes. if i stick the template down with double sided tape, then take it off and it takes the face of my piece with it, i'll be just a little bit perturbed. comments on that, from those who've used it?

              You could draw it out on the enclosure with a pencil and then use your router against a clamped straight edge. Or use something like this:
              i considered that option too, as my router came with one of those that i've used to much success before. but again, the narrow width of the board comes into play, as i mentioned above. a guide like that can only go in as far as the router base and when the work piece is so narrow that the router base hangs off on three of the four sides while making the cut, that kind of guide is rendered useless. although if i put some "buffer" pieces around my work piece, then i could maybe use the integral edge guide. only thing then is i'd need some sort of fence or something to stop me at the two corners/end points of each side. i could probably freehand that much, but i'm trying to be drop dead ultra precise on this build.

              good progress here, and thanks again to everyone whos contributed so far.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: how would you make this cutout?

                Originally posted by Ryan_M View Post
                If that's the case then a possible solution is to make two templates like the one I did - one for the cutout and one for the recess. Use the recess one with a template guide like jimlg mentioned, the cutout could be done the same way too. Or just one template for the recess/flange and then just jig saw out the center for the cutout.
                you read my mind. i think some good ideas are really starting to come together in my head, that wouldn't involve completely hacking up any of my nice big pieces of scrap that i was hoping to save for other projects. ahh, brainstorming

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: how would you make this cutout?

                  It can be done easily without a sophisticated jig, just a scape piece of wood and some clamps.

                  You're going to cut a hole in scrape piece ~6"x8" and surface mount the plate. This can be cut with a jigsaw as the quality of the cut is not important - it's covered by the flange on the plate.

                  Then draw a rectangle on the back of the speaker 1" larger than the overall dimensions of the plate. Your going to mount the 6x8 to the inside of the cabinet. Instant recess.

                  The rectangle you cut in the cabinet will require a little precision because it is exposed and visible. To get a straight cut, align the bit on your intended line and clamp a scrape piece to the cabinet as a straight edge guide for your router base. Route the line. Then move the scrape and repeat for all four cuts.

                  I would then chamfer or radius the cut with an appropriate bit for better appearance.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: how would you make this cutout?

                    Layout the cutout on the board. Drill 4 holes in each of the corners the same diameter as the plastic round off. Get out your saber saw and connect the dots. If you are fairly careful, sandpaper will take care of the rest.
                    Lou's Speaker Site [speakers.lonesaguaro.com]
                    "Different" is objective, "better" is subjective. Taste is not a provable fact.
                    Where are you John Galt? I may not be worthy, but I'm ready.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: how would you make this cutout?

                      Originally posted by dwigle View Post
                      It can be done easily without a sophisticated jig, just a scape piece of wood and some clamps.

                      You're going to cut a hole in scrape piece ~6"x8" and surface mount the plate. This can be cut with a jigsaw as the quality of the cut is not important - it's covered by the flange on the plate.

                      Then draw a rectangle on the back of the speaker 1" larger than the overall dimensions of the plate. Your going to mount the 6x8 to the inside of the cabinet. Instant recess.

                      The rectangle you cut in the cabinet will require a little precision because it is exposed and visible. To get a straight cut, align the bit on your intended line and clamp a scrape piece to the cabinet as a straight edge guide for your router base. Route the line. Then move the scrape and repeat for all four cuts.

                      I would then chamfer or radius the cut with an appropriate bit for better appearance.
                      There is a photo of what it can look like in this thread: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...=220074&page=2

                      Comment

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