Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Burning in hi-pass capacitors

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • CAPS - FR graphs - pink noise and sweeps

    I will eventually get around to corralling some guinea pigs for the cap listening tests, but I figured I could run some FR graphs in the meantime. I measured each cap with pink noise and a quick sweep. One cap is cooked for just about 200 hours and the other is not.

    Mic placement: Basically I stuck the mic about 1 inch from the tweeter.



    I ran 1 minute of pink noise with 500 averages and plotted the non-smoothed results for each pair of caps, and then separated the pairs by 10db.

    In this first graph the bottom pair are the Clarity ESA caps, the middle pair are the Sonicap G1's and the top pair are the Dayton 5%.



    For the second test I did a quick spectrum sweep and then separated the pairs by 10db.

    Same parings as before-- The bottom pair are the Clarity ESA caps, the middle pair are the Sonicap G1's and the top pair are the Dayton 5%.



    From a purely objective perspective, there appears to be no significant difference between the cooked and non-cooked caps for any of the manufacturers. I really doubt that the minor fluctuations in the plots can be detected by the human ear in any sort of music program.

    Now if anyone is a TrueRTA guru and would like to point out a better methodology for this test, please do so, and I will remeasure.

    I will still get around to the subjective tests. Unfortunately, that is a much tougher proposition.
    Bryan K.

    Midwest Audio Club

    Speedster | | The Wildeman | Sean's NLA Towers | , COUGAR II and | Triton | Lithium | J-Boom | Trym MLTL | Docere MLTL

    Comment


    • Re: CAPS - FR graphs - pink noise and sweeps

      Originally posted by bkeane1259 View Post
      From a purely objective perspective, there appears to be no significant difference between the cooked and non-cooked caps for any of the manufacturers. I really doubt that the minor fluctuations in the plots can be detected by the human ear in any sort of music program.
      The only way to determine if you're right about this is to conduct listening tests.

      I will still get around to the subjective tests. Unfortunately, that is a much tougher proposition.
      Oh, yeah. It sure is.

      Comment

      Working...
      X