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  • help me identify this grain/species

    i'm about to start on a set of Paul's core 2-ways for my brother, and he said he'd like it if i could make them match some furniture he recently got from target. i've got the color and the design cues taken care of, but i'd like the grain to match as closely as possible too. based on the pictures below, can anyone weigh in on what species you think the veneer on this furniture is?






  • #2
    Re: help me identify this grain/species

    Hard to say with factory stain on it. My guess is some kind of Mahogany or possibly quarter cut cherry.
    Lou's Speaker Site [speakers.lonesaguaro.com]
    "Different" is objective, "better" is subjective. Taste is not a provable fact.
    Where are you John Galt? I may not be worthy, but I'm ready.

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    • #3
      Re: help me identify this grain/species

      It's African mahogany. Your best bet is to get ribbon cut. I think that your sample is finished without a stain.

      Bob

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      • #4
        Re: help me identify this grain/species

        Hard to say under a stain if it's African or Honduran mahogany. Definitely Mahogany tho.
        http://www.diy-ny.com/

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        • #5
          Re: help me identify this grain/species

          thanks for the help so far, gentlemen. mahogany makes sense as, now that i think about it, the grain on the furniture is somewhat similar to some sapele i've worked with prior, which is said to be similar to mahogany.

          i'm a little hesitant to go with a ribbon stripe, as all the ribbon stripes i've ever seen or worked with are far more "ribbon-y" than what i'm trying to match. unfortunately though, most places (formwood, veneer supplies, tape-ease) don't differentiate between quartered mahogany and ribbon striped mahogany - only between quarted/ribbon and flat cut. oakwood, on the other hand, does list all three separately. is this just a question of sorting, where oakwood separates the more ribbon-y from the less ribbon-y and calls the former ribbon striped and the latter quarter cut, and the others do not? or is there more to it than that?

          also, while browsing around i came across a species i've never heard of before, called okoume (okume). apparently its mostly used in plywood form for marine applications, but veneer supplies carries sheets of it. the grain seems somewhat similar to mahogany (albeit a different color), and the cost seems a little more attractive (read: cheaper). is anyone familiar? assuming i'm going to have to stain to match the color either way, could this possibly serve as a "close enough" lower cost alternative?

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          • #6
            Re: help me identify this grain/species

            since it's been a few days, i thought i'd go ahead and bump this to see if i could get some answers to any of the questions in my last reply. anyone?

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            • #7
              Re: help me identify this grain/species

              You are at a fork in the road. Which way to go is darn near impossible to decide without the "subject" to match to the "object".
              There are so many varieties of wood which the marketers are likely to lump into "mahogany" that it is like pine: which one is being referred to? The name is becoming a catch-all for several different trees.
              Mongo only pawn in game of life
              ____
              Ed

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              • #8
                Re: help me identify this grain/species

                You'll never match it exactly without stain and/or dye. Most likely the factory used some kind of staining to keep things consistent. It's always easier to make wood darker. I don't think you'll get grain to "match" the best you can do is consistent color.
                Lou's Speaker Site [speakers.lonesaguaro.com]
                "Different" is objective, "better" is subjective. Taste is not a provable fact.
                Where are you John Galt? I may not be worthy, but I'm ready.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: help me identify this grain/species

                  Originally posted by absolootbs View Post
                  also, while browsing around i came across a species i've never heard of before, called okoume (okume). apparently its mostly used in plywood form for marine applications, but veneer supplies carries sheets of it. the grain seems somewhat similar to mahogany (albeit a different color), and the cost seems a little more attractive (read: cheaper). is anyone familiar? assuming i'm going to have to stain to match the color either way, could this possibly serve as a "close enough" lower cost alternative?
                  Okoume is used extensively in marine grade plywoods. The better grade is BS1088, which features waterproof glues and no voids. I've built a few boats with it and it's light weight, light colored and easily worked. It takes stain very well, but has little grain pattern.

                  Based on the pictures you posted, I would agree with those that think it's African Mahogany. At the end of the day, I suspect stain and finish is more important than matching the wood exactly. Just my 2 cents....
                  If life were fair, Elvis would still be alive today and all the impersonators would be dead.
                  ~ Johnny Carson

                  Bungelow Ed's Photo Album http://techtalk.parts-express.com/album.php?u=8594

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                  • #10
                    Re: help me identify this grain/species

                    It is sometimes difficult to identify wood in a photo, but your sample seems similar to some veneer I was given several years ago, that was left over from the manufacturer of Otis Elevator cars. I was told it is African Cheery, which is Makore. What I have is wonderful to work and bags well. I have included a link to the photo on the Certainly Wood website. Perhaps the people at Certainly wood can help you, they have been a reliable and helpful source for me for 30 years+.

                    http://www.certainlywood.com/detail.cfm?ID=2550

                    tna

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