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  • Evacuation

    Bloomberg just ordered a mandatory evacuation of coastal areas of Brooklyn, Queens, SI and Manhattan...a first in NYC history.

    r-carpenter's shop in Navy Yards comes to mind. Roman, I know you don't live there, but I hope you are keeping yourself safe and sound.

    Many coastal areas in the east are under orders to evacuate. I hope everyone affected stays safe.
    Last edited by jclin4; 08-26-2011, 05:56 PM.

  • #2
    Re: Evacuation

    Just returned from my sister's house in Greenwich, NJ which is within throwing distance from the water/Delaware bay. Putting plywood on some of the sliding glass doors of her house of which there are 8! She likes her views.

    I hope it steers off to sea instead of doing what everyone is fearing. My wife is on the phone with her sister who lives in upper Manhattan. Mayor said he is shutting down Mass Transit at noon tomorrow just like Philly. Pretty much unprecedented. Must be a big deal!

    Stay safe everyone.
    TomZ
    Zarbo Audio Projects Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEZ...aFQSTl6NdOwgxQ * 320-641 Amp Review Youtube: https://youtu.be/ugjfcI5p6m0 *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
    *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF

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    • #3
      Re: Evacuation

      One little tropical storm and the whole northern East coast is evacuating. :p

      But honestly, hope everyone's properties come out alright. It's a real mess. My house in Biloxi was turned into a concrete slab, there wasn't even debris left. Some of my friends even had fishing boats parked in their backyards. :eek:

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      • #4
        Re: Evacuation

        I've never lived through a hurricane, but I'm pretty sure there have been stronger hurricanes than this one. In NYC, B'berg should just have told everyone to stay inside.

        (Warning: Political Joke Below)

        Maybe the rebuilding process from the hurricane is Obama's 'jobs plan', and the earthquake beforehand was artificially induced to soften up the structures of the buildings affected?
        Best Regards,

        Rory Buszka

        Taterworks Audio

        "The work of the individual still remains the spark which moves mankind ahead, even more than teamwork." - Igor I. Sikorsky

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        • #5
          Re: Evacuation

          Originally posted by Taterworks View Post
          I've never lived through a hurricane, but I'm pretty sure there have been stronger hurricanes than this one. In NYC, B'berg should just have told everyone to stay inside.

          (Warning: Political Joke Below)

          Maybe the rebuilding process from the hurricane is Obama's 'jobs plan', and the earthquake beforehand was artificially induced to soften up the structures of the buildings affected?
          There have been stronger ones, but none that have gone so far up north.

          New York will be hit pretty hard from what I'm hearing. Not only is the hurricane bringing some pretty bad weather up there, but its also a high tide and a full moon. They're saying the ferry that usually takes people to the statue of liberty will be under 9 feet of water.
          Modding the Lepai T-Amp

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          • #6
            Re: Evacuation

            A class II hurricane rolling over at least 25 million people in the most densely populated region of our country if not the world. Building and infrastructure value in the $10's of trillions too. What could possibly go wrong?

            At the very least, I predict a massive price increase for lumber and building materials over the next several years. If you are outside of the danger zone, stock up on MDF and Ply now while you still have the chance!

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            • #7
              Re: Evacuation

              South of Sunrise highway on Long Island was advised to evacuate too. That's pretty much the shoreline to 2+ miles inland.

              I can't wait until this is over with.
              "He who fights with monsters should look to it that he himself does not become a monster. And when you gaze long into an abyss the abyss also gazes into you." Friedrich Nietzsche

              http://www.diy-ny.com/

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              • #8
                Re: Evacuation

                Supposedly the severity of Irene isn't the strength so much as the size and the rain it is bringing. I live in Hampton, VA, 2 hours north of the Outer Banks/Nags Head.

                We get a good Nor'easter here and we get a foot of flooding for a day or two in areas. Can't imagine what this is going to be like. I'll see if I can find the vid I took of the Nor'easter a year or two ago where the water near us raised about three to four feet and came up to my apartments patio door. And now a hurricane is coming?

                Sweet. :rolleyes: I guess living in a city that is on average 10ft above sea level is sometimes a bad thing.
                Builds - C-Killa - Speedsters - LithMTM - Talking Sticks - Pocket Rockets - Khanspires - Dayton RS Center - RS225/28A - Kairos - Adelphos - SEOS TD12X - Dayton 8 - Needles - 871S - eD6c - Overnight Sensations - Tritrix (ported) - Lineup F4 - Stentorians - The Cheapies - Tub Thumpers - Barbells - Tuba HT - Numerous subwoofers - probably missing a few...... :p

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                • #9
                  Re: Evacuation

                  Originally posted by jclin4 View Post
                  Bloomberg just ordered a mandatory evacuation of coastal areas of Brooklyn, Queens, SI and Manhattan...a first in NYC history....
                  The legacy of Katrina is that no one takes hurricanes lightly, and I see this as a good thing. The very bad thing is Irene - it could be 10x worse....

                  I spent my college summers in Wildwood, NJ, the first island north of Cape May, southern tip of NJ. Most of the Atlantic coast is islands. Wildwood's evacuated, too, because the Wildwood Italian Bakery will be history if Irene turns a little west. I remember heavy thunderstorms flooding streets because there's no "down" for the water to follow. Now imagine a 10-20 foot increase in sea level....

                  These cities from NC through Maine have not seen a storm like this in modern times. Irene's the size of EUROPE - I'm in awe (and thankfully unaffected).

                  I'm also hoping no one along the coast is getting this message from home....

                  (normal thoughts and prayers stuff; it's all we've got)
                  Frank

                  PS I just realized, this storm is hitting the 13 Colonies. Hope our enemies don't notice....

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                  • #10
                    Re: Evacuation

                    Let the gouging begin...
                    Gas prices went up 25 - 30 cents today in response.
                    ( we are not even in the path of what hasn't happen yet )
                    "Not a Speaker Designer - Not even on the Internet"
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                    "If the freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter."

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                    • #11
                      Re: Evacuation

                      Originally posted by XtremeRevolution View Post
                      There have been stronger ones, but none that have gone so far up north.

                      New York will be hit pretty hard from what I'm hearing. Not only is the hurricane bringing some pretty bad weather up there, but its also a high tide and a full moon. They're saying the ferry that usually takes people to the statue of liberty will be under 9 feet of water.
                      73 years ago there was a category 3 that blew up the Connecticut River Valley, pretty similar track to what is currently forcasted for Irene, though Irene may change considerably before it hits New England.

                      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1938_New_England_hurricane




                      http://www.erh.noaa.gov/box/hurrican...cane1938.shtml

                      The Great New England Hurricane of 1938

                      CAT 3 - September 21, 1938

                      The Great New England Hurricane of 1938 was one of the most destructive and powerful storms ever to strike Southern New England. This system developed in the far eastern Atlantic, near the Cape Verde Islands on September 4. It made a twelve day journey across the Atlantic and up the Eastern Seaboard before crashing ashore on September 21 at Suffolk County, Long Island, then into Milford, Connecticut. The eye of the hurricane was observed in New Haven, Connecticut, 10 miles east of Milford. The center made landfall at the time of astronomical high tide, moving north at 60 mph. Unlike most storms, this hurricane did not weaken on its way toward Southern New England, due to its rapid forward speed and its track. This kept the center of the storm over the warm waters of the Gulf Stream.

                      Sustained hurricane force winds occurred throughout most of Southern New England. The strongest winds ever recorded in the region occurred at the Blue Hill Observatory with sustained winds of 121 mph and a peak gust of 186 mph. Sustained winds of 91 mph with a gust to 121 mph was reported on Block Island. Providence, Rhode Island recorded sustained winds of 100 mph with a gust to 125 mph. Extensive damage occurred to roofs, trees and crops. Widespread power outages occurred, which in some areas lasted several weeks. In Connecticut, downed power lines resulted in catastrophic fires to sections of New London and Mystic. The lowest pressure at the time of landfall occurred on the south side of Long Island, at Bellport, where a reading of 27.94 inches was recorded. Other low pressures included 28.00 inches in Middletown, Connecticut and 28.04 inches in Hartford, Connecticut.

                      The hurricane produced storm tides of 14 to 18 feet across most of the Connecticut coast, with 18 to 25 foot tides from New London east to Cape Cod. The destructive power of the storm surge was felt throughout the coastal community. Narragansett Bay took the worst hit, where a storm surge of 12 to 15 feet destroyed most coastal homes, marinas and yacht clubs. Downtown Providence, Rhode Island was submerged under a storm tide of nearly 20 feet. Sections of Falmouth and New Bedford, Massachusetts were submerged under as much as 8 feet of water. All three locations had very rapid tides increased within 1.5 hours of the highest water mark.

                      Rainfall from this hurricane resulted in severe river flooding across sections of Massachusetts and Connecticut. Three to six inches fell across much of western Massachusetts and all but extreme eastern Connecticut. Considerably less rain occurred to the east across Rhode Island and the remainder of Massachusetts. The rainfall from the hurricane added to the amounts that had occurred with a frontal system several days before the hurricane struck. The combined effects from the frontal system and the hurricane produced rainfall of 10 to 17 inches across most of the Connecticut River Valley. This resulted in some of the worst flooding ever recorded in this area. Roadways were washed away along with sections of the New York, New Haven, and Hartford Railroad lines. The Connecticut River, in Hartford reached a level of 35.4 feet, which was 19.4 feet above flood stage. Further upstream, in the vicinity of Springfield, Massachusetts, the river rose to 6 to 10 feet above flood stage, causing significant damage. A total of 8,900 homes, cottages and buildings were destroyed, and over 15,000 were damaged by the hurricane. The marine community was devastated. Over 2,600 boats were destroyed, and over 3,300 damaged. Entire fleets were lost in marines and yacht clubs along Narragansett Bay. The hurricane was responsible for 564 deaths and at least 1,700 injuries in Southern New England. Damage to the fishing fleets in Southern New England was catastrophic. A total of 2,605 vessels were destroyed, with 3,369 damaged.

                      Summary

                      Widespread inland flooding, high winds inland, with severe coastal flooding.

                      PUBLIC IMPACT

                      Deaths: 564 Injured: >1,700

                      BOATING IMPACT

                      Destroyed: 2,600 Damaged: 3,300

                      HOMES/BUILDINGS

                      Destroyed: 8,900 Damaged: > 15,000

                      Catastrophic fires touched off by powerlines in Connecticut!
                      "Our Nation’s interests are best served by fostering a peaceful global system comprised
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                      • #12
                        Re: Evacuation

                        Originally posted by jclin4 View Post
                        Bloomberg just ordered a mandatory evacuation of coastal areas of Brooklyn, Queens, SI and Manhattan...a first in NYC history.

                        r-carpenter's shop in Navy Yards comes to mind. Roman, I know you don't live there, but I hope you are keeping yourself safe and sound.

                        Many coastal areas in the east are under orders to evacuate. I hope everyone affected stays safe.
                        Navy Yard is under mandatory evacuation as of 3:15 today. I worked, as usual... but not going back tomorrow. Shop is 500ft away from the water so there's a very good chance I'd need a boat to get out.
                        I live in a "green" zone, so will probably loose power, internet, cell service but other then that, we should be fine.
                        Thanks.
                        Hopefully this storm isn't going to be a "historic proportions"
                        http://www.diy-ny.com/

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                        • #13
                          Re: Evacuation

                          The eye (such as it is) of the storm (such as it was) is due to roll over my house in about 3 hours. We weren't going unless it was to be a 4 - been through a few 3's here, quite a few smaller ones. Servers pulled and stashed, backup drives in another location, all the work stuff was evac'd yesterday - now let the fun begin! Donning the waders and heading for the beach, bound to be some nice shots in here soon. BTW, although thw Weather guys never say it, storms that track for over a week seldom hold up at big strength, too many things can happen, as it did yesterday afternoon. Don't ask Cantore, ask an Outer Banker.
                          When you run make sure you run,
                          to something not away from, cause lies don't need an aeroplane to chase you anywhere.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Evacuation

                            Yeah they usually dissipate as soon as they hit the gulf coast, then about 6 hours later, people are back at the beach. ;)

                            रेतुर्न तो थे स्रोत
                            return to the source
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                            deadhorse thread
                            shockwave build thread

                            instagram :: greywarden_13

                            in war, victory . . . in peace, vigilance . . . in death, sacrifice.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Evacuation

                              Joey Butts is getting some serious rain and wind right now...

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