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All I can say is.. it definitely sounds better!

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  • All I can say is.. it definitely sounds better!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jVATl...feature=relmfu

    Take a look at this video, I hope you guys can have a lot of fun with this!

    I recently learned about the A above middle C being tuned to 432Hz and I have a feel for it, but don't have it mastered in terms of technical details. I am using Foobar2000 with the SoundTouch plugin to just play all of my music retuned to A=432Hz as opposed to 440Hz and everything definitely sounds better.

    And I was wondering, what would be the best way to retune like this in signal line to the amp?? I just want a box I can plug thru to do this. Is that possible to do passive, or would it have to be powered??

    Really, take a look into it, it makes a lot of sense. One thing I realized is that a cubic foot is 1728 in^3 and thats two octaves above 432Hz (with different units of course). Lots of funny seemingly coincidental things happen when you play with these numbers.

  • #2
    Re: All I can say is.. it definitely sounds better!

    That guy lost me at: '4500 years ago the Chinese were using the vibration of music to control the people.'

    Also I don't think he blinks.

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    • #3
      Re: All I can say is.. it definitely sounds better!

      interesting-

      he got the resting heartrate wrong- athletes are 40-60 usually, averages are around 70 in a healthy adult. The moon is technically about a mile less than his claim in diameter, the sun slightly different too- the golf ball is a coincidence most likely and the budhist part only fits because they operated with similar assumptions the guy does.

      I have seen lots of cool stuff related to math and this creation, which is always neat i think. and the pythagoras part was neat, although pythagoras did not promote 432! but he did have some astonishing mathematical discoveries.

      the video did provide some cool history, thanks for the post.

      about your question, I am not sure, but someone will chime in.

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      • #4
        Re: All I can say is.. it definitely sounds better!

        This guy is a wee bit crazy, and seems to oversimplify to make his point as mentioned above...reminded me of that thriller with Jim Carry, which now that I think about I paid 9 dollars for which is 4+3+2!

        ZOMG!

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        • #5
          Re: All I can say is.. it definitely sounds better!

          It's 432.7 Hz for the International standard A1'. The International standard weighted scale does NOT double the frequency per octave nor half it per octave lower, as this throws off the "weighting" of the scale for tuning a piano, or wind instruments or Bach's "Well Tempered Scale" vs: the ancient "Perfect Pitched Scale". Google can confirm ll of this.

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          • #6
            Re: All I can say is.. it definitely sounds better!

            There must be something to it - I'm going to redesign all my crossovers and port tunings to multiples of 423 .

            but I'm curious - how did they know it was 432 Hz - ok Hertz wasn't born yet so there was no such unit. So it was cycles per second. So I'm curious how they might have measured that 4500 years ago.

            Maybe I'll just sit in my pyramid when I listen, that affects the sound too you know
            BEER: Proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy

            I've measured many things I cannot hear; and heard things I cannot measure...

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            • #7
              Re: All I can say is.. it definitely sounds better!

              Originally posted by Whitneyville1 View Post
              It's 432.7 Hz for the International standard A1'. The International standard weighted scale does NOT double the frequency per octave nor half it per octave lower, as this throws off the "weighting" of the scale for tuning a piano, or wind instruments or Bach's "Well Tempered Scale" vs: the ancient "Perfect Pitched Scale". Google can confirm ll of this.
              If high C, and Low C, are not related by exactly 2, they will not strike a single note, but one that "beats". Now, in a piano, the strings are slightly detuned from one another for each note, to create the sound, but the average of the vibrations are definitely harmonic according to scale, and that's by a doubling of frequency, A to A.

              http://ptolemy.eecs.berkeley.edu/eec...ek8/scale.html


              Of course, one can always arbitrarily choose where a scale would start, as long as it repeats on some level, so 432 vs. 440 . . . well c'mon, really? The "second" is an arbitrary unit anyway.
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              • #8
                Re: All I can say is.. it definitely sounds better!

                Pete, go back a whole bunch further to J. S. Bach's "Well Tempered Clavier". To be able to "modulate" from key to key in a piece of music he "crunched" the octaves ever so slightly. If you strike a five or six octave note on a piano, you'll notice it doesn't doesn't sound quite "right". On a pipe organ, depending on the "chorus" it can be painful. I have an electronic pitch tuning machine for my wind instruments, an old Selmer electro-mechanical unit, and it shows very clearly that an well-tempered octave isn't a true doubling of frequency. If I flip the switch to "Perfect Pitch" then it shows an octave as a doubling of frequency. When I was learning to play the English Horn (Haughtbouy), I used this machine to learn to play it in tune with itself (and the rest of the orchestra) as mine wasn't an improved Boehm System instrument, it was a period Alprecht System (forked fingered, half-holed) instrument.
                I'm cheating. I was a music major and had to learn this, and tell the piccolo to "roll in" if they played the same note as a tuba, who had to "lip-up".;) This is why marching bands on football fields, where they can't hear each other, can sound "out of tune".

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                • #9
                  Re: All I can say is.. it definitely sounds better!

                  Aptly posted on 4/20. :rolleyes:

                  nothing can stop me now

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