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Groundbreaking Study On Perceived Audio Quality

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  • #2
    It figures that companies peddling crap would rationalize their gross margins on " generation Y" not caring about audio quality. That whole concept is a sham.
    Anyone with ears can delineate good sound from bad for the most part without "training" although i am a proponent of critical listening skills for the greater enjoyment of ______.
    Blaming " generation Y" for not caring about quality is a cop out for profit. Many products aimed at this demographic are overpriced and of inferior quality.
    Blaming " generation Y " for this neglect is akin to saying " SPOONS MADE ME FAT". Total corporate cop out.

    I applaud Harmon for doing this study and dispelling the fairy tale that untrained listeners without much money dont care about quality. They do care.

    The other part of me wants to tell Harmon...


    Well, DUH.


    A little more than my 2c

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    • #3
      Re: Groundbreaking Study On Perceived Audio Quality

      Well I prefer YouTube videos with sound...

      Their conclusion they they need to educate generation y was strange when their study still showed the lesser educated still preferring better sound...

      I am not sure it is corporate bs rather than an audio company wanting to find out why everything is dying and downloadable videos and music are taking over...consumers are in fact preferring this format as is evidence by the closing of record stores and the fall of the video stores... However I think it is more of a choice of price and convenience and if you gave the masses cd quality downloadable audio that did not chew up more space, they would likely opt for that...

      I want to know what speakers were a,b,c, and d.....
      Mark


      http://www.diy-ny.com

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      • #4
        Re: Groundbreaking Study On Perceived Audio Quality

        Most people I know don’t really care about the sound quality. But if you ask them which pair of speakers sound better even my grandchildren (7 and 10 years old) seem to be able to pick the same as I do

        I think the ability to discriminate the sound quality(or authenticity of sound)is part of our survival instinct.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Groundbreaking Study On Perceived Audio Quality

          Harman has a long history of research and testing to determine what characteristics listeners prefer in products. You think all they got out of this was "people prefer better sound?"


          Originally posted by Sonic Temple View Post
          It figures that companies peddling crap would rationalize their gross margins on " generation Y" not caring about audio quality. That whole concept is a sham.
          Anyone with ears can delineate good sound from bad for the most part without "training" although i am a proponent of critical listening skills for the greater enjoyment of ______.
          Blaming " generation Y" for not caring about quality is a cop out for profit. Many products aimed at this demographic are overpriced and of inferior quality.
          Blaming " generation Y " for this neglect is akin to saying " SPOONS MADE ME FAT". Total corporate cop out.

          I applaud Harmon for doing this study and dispelling the fairy tale that untrained listeners without much money dont care about quality. They do care.

          The other part of me wants to tell Harmon...


          Well, DUH.


          A little more than my 2c
          I was so much older then, I'm younger than that now.
          OS MTMs http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...d.php?t=220388
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          Econowave and Audio Nirvana AN10 fullrange http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...d.php?t=216841
          Imperial Russian Stouts http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...=1#post1840444
          LECBOS. http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...ghlight=lecbos

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          • #6
            Re: Groundbreaking Study On Perceived Audio Quality

            Originally posted by Sonic Temple View Post
            ...Blaming " generation Y" for not caring about quality is a cop out for profit.
            Absolute, total, complete nonsense. "The business of business is business". (Milton Friedman)

            Americans have developed "cheap" to an art form. The lowest price always wins, regardless of quality or anything else. Some years back WalMart (blame everything on WalMArt!) tried to run a "Made in USA" campaign. Nope, the vote (dollars) went to Chinese imports. Screw the Americans who lost their jobs. If you want further evidence, just look at the posts on this forum. "I want to make some great speakers cheap." Buyouts--what is a buyout except profiting on someone else's misfortune.

            The consumer philosophy of the modern entitled generation is "I want it, I want it now and I want it for free". It is a race to see who can accumulate the most stuff, and to do that, the stuff has to be cheap (however you want to define "cheap". Don't blame the seller, blame the buyer. Until the average consumer acquires some sense of the consequences of buying at the lowest price, nothing will change.

            Bob

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            • #7
              Re: Groundbreaking Study On Perceived Audio Quality

              Originally posted by Bob Brines View Post
              Absolute, total, complete nonsense. "The business of business is business". (Milton Friedman)

              Americans have developed "cheap" to an art form. The lowest price always wins, regardless of quality or anything else. Some years back WalMart (blame everything on WalMArt!) tried to run a "Made in USA" campaign. Nope, the vote (dollars) went to Chinese imports. Screw the Americans who lost their jobs. If you want further evidence, just look at the posts on this forum. "I want to make some great speakers cheap." Buyouts--what is a buyout except profiting on someone else's misfortune.

              The consumer philosophy of the modern entitled generation is "I want it, I want it now and I want it for free". It is a race to see who can accumulate the most stuff, and to do that, the stuff has to be cheap (however you want to define "cheap". Don't blame the seller, blame the buyer. Until the average consumer acquires some sense of the consequences of buying at the lowest price, nothing will change.

              Bob
              That is also non-sense, since it deflects all blame for maximizing bottom line at the expense of the consumer back to the consumer, ignoring some very real decisions made by American companies to that end.

              It is more complex than the two scenarios presented, as I am sure everyone at least suspects.

              An argument could be made that the "go cheap" trend is the market response to the overwhelming stagnation of wages since the early 1980's. We don't want cheap simply to be cheap and accumulate goods, it is all most people can afford.

              This forum cracks me up sometimes, a significant percentage of the posters are well above the national income median and that shows up from time to time.

              Back to the OT, I find it not at all surprising that this was the conclusion. It is the conclusion every time these things are controlled properly. Neutral, low distortion speakers always win out when you remove the bling, the price tag and the cabinet finish at least.

              Harmon has also done some interesting testing on speakers that *look* expensive but are made very cheaply. Similar to the wine price tag switching, as expected preference followed perceived price tag.
              Don't listen to me - I have not sold any $150,000 speakers.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Groundbreaking Study On Perceived Audio Quality

                Am I missing something, but the caption refers to headphones and the video speakers. The result of the video is flat FR is preferred with a small sample size and the speaker results may be misrepresented.
                Kenny

                http://www.diy-ny.com/
                DIY NY/NJ 2014 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FGwA...ature=youtu.be
                Man does not live by measurements alone, a little music helps.

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                • #9
                  Re: Groundbreaking Study On Perceived Audio Quality

                  Originally posted by johnnyrichards View Post
                  Similar to the wine price tag switching, as expected preference followed perceived price tag.
                  That's why I've resorted to making my own...*hiccup*...
                  "He who fights with monsters should look to it that he himself does not become a monster. And when you gaze long into an abyss the abyss also gazes into you." Friedrich Nietzsche

                  http://www.diy-ny.com/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Groundbreaking Study On Perceived Audio Quality

                    Originally posted by Face View Post
                    That's why I've resorted to making my own...*hiccup*...
                    My next DIY journey will be wine and beer making
                    Don't listen to me - I have not sold any $150,000 speakers.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Groundbreaking Study On Perceived Audio Quality

                      Originally posted by Bob Brines View Post
                      Absolute, total, complete nonsense. "The business of business is business". (Milton Friedman)

                      Americans have developed "cheap" to an art form. The lowest price always wins, regardless of quality or anything else. Some years back WalMart (blame everything on WalMArt!) tried to run a "Made in USA" campaign. Nope, the vote (dollars) went to Chinese imports. Screw the Americans who lost their jobs. If you want further evidence, just look at the posts on this forum. "I want to make some great speakers cheap." Buyouts--what is a buyout except profiting on someone else's misfortune.

                      The consumer philosophy of the modern entitled generation is "I want it, I want it now and I want it for free". It is a race to see who can accumulate the most stuff, and to do that, the stuff has to be cheap (however you want to define "cheap". Don't blame the seller, blame the buyer. Until the average consumer acquires some sense of the consequences of buying at the lowest price, nothing will change.

                      Bob

                      Bob,

                      I agree with the majority of what you said. There is a round and round and round cycle to the direction this country is heading.
                      Years ago I feel that the consumer decided the fate and direction of business and products - manufacturing. Now due to every aspect of our society, the business and manufacturing is winning..... I can blame the consumer due to economics, not necessarily the economy. When I can buy something for a task, and replace it 4 times for less than the cost of a "good original unit" then I guess thats how most consumers fall. This creates a cycle of cheap-replaceable-everything.
                      It is cheaper to go to a paid-staff fast food chain for a family of 4 to stuff themselves than it is to buy and prepare your own modestly sized meal using fresh vegetables and meat.
                      The most weight to this argument is based on what the consumer wants, what they can afford, and whats available....
                      From the audio standpoint let me say this.... Growing up in the 80s-90s there were 5 hifi and high end audio shops within driving distance to me. Once best buy opened in on local town, it was no more than a year before all 5 audio shops were gone. I can, but wont draw the line on where to place the fault.... low profit high volume sales tactics, or consumers becoming cheaper-smarter?-poorer- or simply after cheap goods. Well, even when these hifi stores were open, one could go to Sears and buy a set of $150 Fisher monkey coffins and be perfectly happy.... or they could spend $2k on a high end fancy setup from the hifi. Then along comes the plastic revolution.... smaller, lighter faster, cheaper (even if not cheaper than the $150 fishers) and consumers are eating it up. You can impulse buy a set of speakers weighing 5lbs but cannot impulse buy a set of 150lb speakers that easily.
                      I have always only wanted quality items, heck call me an audiophile because I will (when I can) buy something with highly diminished returns because I can, and I want to. But I will also buy a cheap $5 item that will break in a short period of time because that is hard not to do in this day in age.

                      In ending, I dont blame the seller. Yes, consumerism has hit an alltime trend for cheap goods. And Bob is correct that it will not change until the consumer demands better items. we need to shop at more small-local shops for these better items, not WalMart.
                      Unfortunately, the economy and pay ranges and unemployment are hindering this when the desire for fine quality is present. I know that there are high end grocers in my area, but I still need to buy the cheaper stuff the majority of the time.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Groundbreaking Study On Perceived Audio Quality

                        Thanks for sharing. IMO, it's not that most people can't hear the difference between poor and decent audio reproduction. It's that, beyond their own level of acceptable quality, they don't care. That level of acceptable quality is often quite low. Those same folks who won't spend anything on an audio system might spend $20K on a still camera or video outfit or may have $30K worth of jewelry. They'll look at a $5K audio system and think, "Gosh, he could have bought a Rolex" or "Wow, she could have bought a nicer car instead".
                        "We are just statistics, born to consume resources."
                        ~Horace~, 65-8 BC

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Groundbreaking Study On Perceived Audio Quality

                          Originally posted by johnnyrichards View Post
                          My next DIY journey will be wine and beer making
                          Start saving your bottles and combing Craigslist for carboys now.
                          "He who fights with monsters should look to it that he himself does not become a monster. And when you gaze long into an abyss the abyss also gazes into you." Friedrich Nietzsche

                          http://www.diy-ny.com/

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Groundbreaking Study On Perceived Audio Quality

                            Originally posted by johnnyrichards View Post
                            An argument could be made that the "go cheap" trend is the market response to the overwhelming stagnation of wages since the early 1980's. We don't want cheap simply to be cheap and accumulate goods, it is all most people can afford.
                            Would it more fair to say that "go cheap" is taken upper hand to "go high quality". It's not only a trend in audio but in every other consumer market as well. Aside from the fact that's "going cheap" almost always ends up been more expensive.
                            Do you want to make your own beer because it's cheaper or because you can brew something special and there's a genuine interest in the process? Of cause, horses for courses but a hobbyists approach to audio and general consumerism are two entirely different scenarios.
                            Originally posted by johnnyrichards View Post
                            This forum cracks me up sometimes, a significant percentage of the posters are well above the national income median and that shows up from time to time.
                            I am not sure about that, JR. There are some that clearly are but again, general consensus of this forum is technical aspects of the performance. The other side of the coin would be people criticizing or not even considering the drivers solely based on the higher price margin.
                            Originally posted by johnnyrichards View Post
                            Back to the OT, I find it not at all surprising that this was the conclusion. It is the conclusion every time these things are controlled properly. Neutral, low distortion speakers always win out when you remove the bling, the price tag and the cabinet finish at least
                            True on the bling, but absolutely disagree on the "neutral speakers always win". It's much more complex then that. Neutral flat frequency response speakers almost always loose in short term blind listening conditions.

                            I have to say that I generally agree with Bob. You start buying bread from the guy in the next village because it's half the price, your own bakery will go out of business. It's too bad that that other guy uses slave labor and big big whips and sometimes carrots.
                            http://www.diy-ny.com/

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                            • #15
                              Re: Groundbreaking Study On Perceived Audio Quality

                              Originally posted by r-carpenter View Post

                              I have to say that I generally agree with Bob. You start buying bread from the guy in the next village because it's half the price, your own bakery will go out of business. It's too bad that that other guy uses slave labor and big big whips and sometimes carrots.
                              Obviously the local bakery doesn't know how to market. You don't have to wast gas to get to the local bakery and just think of all the wasted time going to the next town. And of course the local bakery could have a unique pastry or something. Thanks! now i'm hungry.:D

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