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DIY measurement cabinet resonances?

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  • DIY measurement cabinet resonances?

    If there an affordable method to assemble and use an accelerometer in order to measure cabinet panel resonances? I know you can get them from digikey, but I'm have a hard time picturing the rest. Would it be: accelerometer -> jig -> sound card -> (magical level adjust) -> measurement software? Is there an unknown cost here because if its just a jig needed, the cost seems reasonable.

    Also, could you just use a measurement mic very close to the panel and knuckle rap it, record the response, and run that through an FFT transform to see what peaks showed? That seems so simple that it can't work :P
    Audio: Media PC -> Sabre ESS 9023 DAC -> Behringer EP2500 -> (insert speakers of the moment)
    Sites: Jupiter Audioworks - Flicker Stream - Proud Member of Midwest Audio Club

  • #2
    Re: DIY measurement cabinet resonances?

    http://www.libinst.com/accel.htm

    I've still got morning brain or I'd say more. :rolleyes:

    Zach

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    • #3
      Re: DIY measurement cabinet resonances?

      Originally posted by JasonP View Post
      If there an affordableinexpensiveimethod to assemble and use an accelerometer in order to measure cabinet panel resonances? I know you can get them from digikey, but I'm have a hard time picturing the rest. Would it be: accelerometer -> jig -> sound card -> (magical level adjust) -> measurement software? Is there an unknown cost here because if its just a jig needed, the cost seems reasonable.

      Also, could you just use a measurement mic very close to the panel and knuckle rap it, record the response, and run that through an FFT transform to see what peaks showed? That seems so simple that it can't work :P
      If you have holmimpulse you can purchase an Inexpensive mic from Meniscus.
      Live in Southern N.E.? check out the CT Audio Society web site.

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      • #4
        Re: DIY measurement cabinet resonances?

        Originally posted by JasonP View Post
        Also, could you just use a measurement mic very close to the panel and knuckle rap it, record the response, and run that through an FFT transform to see what peaks showed? That seems so simple that it can't work :P
        Sometimes the simplest solution is the best. :applause:
        Drummers don't use dial indicators to adjust their heads.
        www.billfitzmaurice.com
        www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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        • #5
          Originally posted by carlspeak View Post
          If you have holmimpulse you can purchase an Inexpensive mic from Meniscus.
          I believe you can use it with ARTA as well.
          "He who fights with monsters should look to it that he himself does not become a monster. And when you gaze long into an abyss the abyss also gazes into you." Friedrich Nietzsche

          http://www.diy-ny.com/

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          • #6
            Re: DIY measurement cabinet resonances?

            Originally posted by billfitzmaurice View Post
            Sometimes the simplest solution is the best. :applause:
            Drummers don't use dial indicators to adjust their heads.
            Agree the knuckle wrap test does work well for locating areas in need of bracing. A test mic and software helps quantify the frequency and intensity of the resonance and may be able to help pinpoint its location. In my experience, cabinet resonant frequencies can run in the 100-500 hz range.
            Here's what a holmImpulse test looks like using the Meniscus Audio accelerometer. Note the bump around 400 hz.

            Click image for larger version

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            Here is a link to that microphone. It's got a small 1mm jack to plug into your sound card or computer audio input.

            http://meniscusaudio.com/accelerometer-p-233.html
            Live in Southern N.E.? check out the CT Audio Society web site.

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