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Which Type of Enclosure would be recommended for a 14' x 20' living room?

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  • Jay1
    replied
    Re: Which Type of Enclosure would be recommended for a 14' x 20' living room?

    I've only seen measured max output at 20hz, not below.

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  • fbov
    replied
    Re: Which Type of Enclosure would be recommended for a 14' x 20' living room?

    Originally posted by Jay1 View Post
    The EP4K is a great sub amp,... about 650 watts per channel at 4 ohms down to 20hz. You will not need a high pass filter with the UM15 in a sealed box with that amp.
    Still seems to me that you're saying he EP4K rolls off at 20Hz, negating the need for an infrasonic HP filter. Just pointed out the system is excursion safe inherently, regardless the amp LF characteristics.

    Have fun,
    Frank

    Leave a comment:


  • Jay1
    replied
    Re: Which Type of Enclosure would be recommended for a 14' x 20' living room?

    Originally posted by Jay1 View Post
    The EP4K is a great sub amp, it's actually used by a large percentage of DIYers. Google the fan mod for it (or search around AVS Forum), it is loud with the stock fan. It has been measured to put out about 650 watts per channel at 4 ohms down to 20hz. You will not need a high pass filter with the UM15 in a sealed box with that amp.
    Originally posted by fbov View Post


    Where do you see the Umax 15 needing a high pass filter at all in a sealed box? This is 400W, 4 cu ft sealed, as above.
    [ATTACH=CONFIG]36025[/ATTACH]

    HAve fun,
    Frank
    Might want to re read that

    Leave a comment:


  • fbov
    replied
    Re: Which Type of Enclosure would be recommended for a 14' x 20' living room?

    Originally posted by Max_Powers View Post
    ...I will go with two separate sealed enclosures built to ~3.1cu ft each, each box with a single 15" Ultimax subwoofer.

    I did a little research on the crown amp, however, I am really liking this amp, what do you guys think?...
    If 3 cu ft is a hard limit, consider using the Umax 12. In 3 cu ft., Unibox says it digs deeper (F10 is 18.7Hz vs. 20.5Hz for Umax 15 in 3 cu ft.) at a slight SPLmax penalty (-1.3dB at 20Hz). If you can go 4 cu ft, F10 for Umax 15 drops to 18.4Hz - same LF extension - and the SPLmax penalty grows to 3dB, as one would expect from the spec sheet.

    To be fair, however, these are minor differences, likely not audible in your application.

    The EP-series are good value amps, but with the same shortfalls as Crown in a SW application. Behringer's iNUKE series amps have none of the drawbacks...
    http://www.parts-express.com/pe/show...umber=248-6700

    Originally posted by Jay1 View Post
    ... You will not need a high pass filter with the UM15 in a sealed box with that amp.
    Where do you see the Umax 15 needing a high pass filter at all in a sealed box? This is 400W, 4 cu ft sealed, as above.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	CB Response Dayton Umax DVC 15 112L seal_heavy.gif
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    HAve fun,
    Frank

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  • Wolf
    replied
    Re: Which Type of Enclosure would be recommended for a 14' x 20' living room?

    I couldn't wear the hat. My dome is tooooo big! No joke.
    Wolf

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  • bkeane1259
    replied
    Re: Which Type of Enclosure would be recommended for a 14' x 20' living room?

    I recall reading somewhere on the IB boards about this amp and the fan mod as well. The IB guys love it, but yes, the fan does run loudly and it does run often as opposed to the crown amps where most of the time the fans don't even switch on IIRC.

    Anyway, I think you're in for one hell of a setup with dual 15" Ultimax sealed subs. Jealousy is setting in quick.....MUST. LEAVE. NOW.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jay1
    replied
    Re: Which Type of Enclosure would be recommended for a 14' x 20' living room?

    The EP4K is a great sub amp, it's actually used by a large percentage of DIYers. Google the fan mod for it (or search around AVS Forum), it is loud with the stock fan. It has been measured to put out about 650 watts per channel at 4 ohms down to 20hz. You will not need a high pass filter with the UM15 in a sealed box with that amp.

    Leave a comment:


  • Max_Powers
    replied
    Re: Which Type of Enclosure would be recommended for a 14' x 20' living room?

    Thanks once again for the influx of information.

    Hm after careful reconsideration, I think I will go with two separate sealed enclosures built to ~3.1cu ft each, each box with a single 15" Ultimax subwoofer.

    I did a little research on the crown amp, however, I am really liking this amp, what do you guys think?

    http://www.parts-express.com/pe/show...umber=248-6562
    Stereo output, set to low LF crossover.

    It also seems that it will be more budget friendly in that I dont have to buy 2 of the Dayton-1000w amps ~$660 compared with ~$300
    Last edited by Max_Powers; 05-03-2013, 02:06 AM. Reason: Forgot to add some things, did a little more research

    Leave a comment:


  • jsr
    replied
    Re: Which Type of Enclosure would be recommended for a 14' x 20' living room?

    Agree with everything that's already been mentioned. If you can, go with smaller subs but higher quantity of them (4, 6, etc.). The more the better.

    One thing I'd like to mention...you don't like your current sub because it doesn't hit a low enough frequency. Make sure you model whatever you're going to use because many of these subs require a very large enclosure to dig deep. I recall modeling several of the Dayton subs in enclosures that I was comfortable with fitting in my house and couldn't get F3s below low-30s. LFE for movies can hit the teens, so I prefer F3s in low-20s with F10 in teens. Or plan to use something active to boost the low frequencies enough to achieve what you want. None of my subs use any boost (except the one in my car), but that's because I'm poor (and cheap...a nice combo). If you plan to EQ in the low end extension, then you can make a couple of nice compact ones that will dig low. But that costs mula.

    Leave a comment:


  • Face
    replied
    Re: Which Type of Enclosure would be recommended for a 14' x 20' living room?

    Instead of one sub in the front and one in the back, you can also place on sub on each side of your couch, this is what I run in my HT. It will smooth out bass nodes and their close placement will strain them less.

    Leave a comment:


  • bkeane1259
    replied
    Re: Which Type of Enclosure would be recommended for a 14' x 20' living room?

    To each his/her own. Nobody has a more funky setup than I do. One sealed sub on a bridged Adcom - one commercial vented sub with its own plate amp.

    Leave a comment:


  • fbov
    replied
    Re: Which Type of Enclosure would be recommended for a 14' x 20' living room?

    Originally posted by bkeane1259 View Post
    Sorry Frank, but that is simply not true.... 4th order LR adjustable crossovers...
    ...which add nothing in a SW application assuming an AVR to do LFE. I did not speak off-hand.

    Maybe Crown's datasheets are wrong, but 50Hz a bit high for anything but crossing to main speakers, best done by the AVR, so no value added. This amp requires additional processing capability to affect boost and cut filters in the 10-30Hz range where sub amps already work. Granted, $400 for 500+W x2 channels is pretty good, but my plate amps were $460, and have boost/SSF options as well as PEQ, both of which must be added. The 2x4 miniDSP is $125, so I stand by my advice.

    Per Crown (emphasis added, ed.)
    PureBandTM Crossover System
    Crossover Filter: Linkwitz-Riley 24dB per Octave
    Crossover Frequency Range: 50 Hz - 3 kHz (on 1/2 octave centers! ed. )...

    I will admit I missed the RCA jacks... but that was the least of it.

    HAve fun,
    Frank

    PS Bill without knowing a lot about your room, I can't comment on why you get what you do. In a room like this, a single sub may well be all that's needed. Remember it's "loudspeakers and rooms," never one without the other here. I have two subs, well, because...

    Leave a comment:


  • bkeane1259
    replied
    Re: Which Type of Enclosure would be recommended for a 14' x 20' living room?

    Chris,

    Even in my horrible listening space, two subs are better than one. Having a single sub up by the TV creates the worst bass modes on our L-shaped couch. My designated couch position happened to be the worst too, when we had a single sub. I felt like I was sitting in a bass cannon. :eek:

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris Roemer
    replied
    Re: Which Type of Enclosure would be recommended for a 14' x 20' living room?

    Your room isn't THAT huge. I'm pretty sure that a single 12" (personally, I'd go HF vented) given enough power should be adequate for your wants, unless you want to damage something.

    Leave a comment:


  • bkeane1259
    replied
    Re: Which Type of Enclosure would be recommended for a 14' x 20' living room?

    Originally posted by Max_Powers View Post
    Thank you for all this useful information, I am now aiming towards using a single enclosure with two 15" subwoofers, I like the idea of sealed (I am running two JLs in a sealed box in my car and love it).......
    Please do not do that. Understand that you're not dealing with a car environment. Even in small room, multiple subs placed in different areas of the room are always better than a single sub (or a single box with two sub drivers). It's great that your budget allows for something like two Ultimax drivers. DON'T stick them in one box. Build two boxes and experiment with the room placement. It will be 100% obvious to you why this is being recommended.

    If you have friends that live close enough to you, borrow an additional sub and try an experiment before you buy anything for yourself. Just get two subs in your room and put one in front and one in back and notice how much more balanced the bass is as you walk around the room. With a single sub, you should be able to walk around and find an area that is lacking in bass and an area that is booming out of control. Using two subs helps to tame that behavior so that the bass is more uniform across the whole listening space. THIS is what everyone is trying to explain. Hope it makes sense, but you'll only know for yourself if you try it.

    Best of luck and keep us posted.

    Leave a comment:

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