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DIY PCB The Easy Way

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  • randyohoh
    replied
    Re: DIY PCB The Easy Way

    Hey Hongrn, do you have a schematic of the pcb that you started this thread with? I could see this being useful to other members as there seems to be more amp projects being done.

    Leave a comment:


  • philthien
    replied
    Re: DIY PCB The Easy Way

    Originally posted by Pete Basel View Post
    K2? What is the brand, I'm new to this and couldn't find it with google.
    Is it an actual router or a desktop engraver?
    Would a desktop engraver work, I wonder?
    K2 is the brand, I think they're now defunct. The unit is an actual router, it uses a Bosch Colt as the spindle.

    I think an engraver could work, but I don't have a lot of experience even with my router, and I've got none with engravers.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pete Basel
    replied
    Re: DIY PCB The Easy Way

    Originally posted by philthien View Post
    It is just a little K2, it does not have an automatic tool changer. Rather, I'm the manual tool changer.

    If you google "cnc router pcb" you will see plenty of examples of the types of boards where minimal copper is removed.

    If anyone wants to give this a shot, I'd be willing to route a board or two to see how it comes out.

    My maximum x/y are approx. 10.5".
    K2? What is the brand, I'm new to this and couldn't find it with google.
    Is it an actual router or a desktop engraver?
    Would a desktop engraver work, I wonder?

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark Bunte
    replied
    Re: DIY PCB The Easy Way

    Originally posted by hongrn View Post
    I like the blue transfer film method. The price of a sheet is kind of high for my first project, so I opted to use photo paper, but the blue transfer paper seems easier to print to the PCB. Have you tried it? Thanks.
    I used it about 25 years ago in a photo copier. Still needed a little touch-up, but it worked. I had also used a clear transfer film, but it didn't work very well at all.

    If I were to use it today, I'd use a laser printer.

    Leave a comment:


  • hongrn
    replied
    Re: DIY PCB The Easy Way

    I like the blue transfer film method. The price of a sheet is kind of high for my first project, so I opted to use photo paper, but the blue transfer paper seems easier to print to the PCB. Have you tried it? Thanks.

    Originally posted by Mark Bunte View Post
    There's thermal transfer film that you can print your circuit with a laser printer or a photo copier
    onto the film and using an iron, transfer the image to your copper clad material:


    http://www.techniks.com/how_to.htm

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark Bunte
    replied
    Re: DIY PCB The Easy Way

    There's thermal transfer film that you can print your circuit with a laser printer or a photo copier
    onto the film and using an iron, transfer the image to your copper clad material:


    http://www.techniks.com/how_to.htm

    Leave a comment:


  • randyohoh
    replied
    Re: DIY PCB The Easy Way

    The software is pcbgcode and it is a plug-in for Cadsoft's Eagle pcb layout software. There is a free version of Eagle with limitations of a two layer part, a one page schematic, and a max size of 100mm x 80mm (3.937 x 3.150) The pcbgcode is $18 and there are tutorial videos on the web site.

    http://www.cadsoftusa.com/

    https://www.pcbgcode.com/

    I've got years of pcb layout experience and Eagle is fairly simple but the gcode software seems cumbersome to me. Could just be unfamiliarity.

    Leave a comment:


  • philthien
    replied
    Re: DIY PCB The Easy Way

    Originally posted by randyohoh View Post
    The software is pcbgcode and the cost is $18.00. It runs as a plug-in to Eagle and seems somewhat complicated but maybe only due to my lack of familiarity. The free version of Eagle (non-commercial use only) has limits of a one page schematic, a two layer pcb, and a size of 100mm x 80mm (3.937 x 3.150) max. There are short tutorial videos on the pcbgcode web site.

    Eagle has a large component library but chances are that if a project was to be done new components would probably need to be built. I have years of pcb layout experience but not with Eagle and would be willing to buy the gcode software and learn it & Eagle.

    http://www.pcbgcode.com/

    Can you mount a pen in your router to do check plots?
    I don't have a pen but I would be surprised if I couldn't come up with one.

    Leave a comment:


  • randyohoh
    replied
    Re: DIY PCB The Easy Way

    The software is pcbgcode and the cost is $18.00. It runs as a plug-in to Eagle and seems somewhat complicated but maybe only due to my lack of familiarity. The free version of Eagle (non-commercial use only) has limits of a one page schematic, a two layer pcb, and a size of 100mm x 80mm (3.937 x 3.150) max. There are short tutorial videos on the pcbgcode web site.

    Eagle has a large component library but chances are that if a project was to be done new components would probably need to be built. I have years of pcb layout experience but not with Eagle and would be willing to buy the gcode software and learn it & Eagle.

    http://www.pcbgcode.com/

    Can you mount a pen in your router to do check plots?

    Leave a comment:


  • philthien
    replied
    Re: DIY PCB The Easy Way

    Originally posted by randyohoh View Post
    philthien - I saw a program that was developed for Eagle pcb layout software which created tool paths to do exactly what you described. The program WAS free but now there is a cost, like $20.00 or so. It worked with the free version of Eagle. It is probably still available on a hobby pcb forum somewhere. As I remember it the solder pads were "normal" so soldering should be ok. I think it was called isolation routing.
    Interesting. Well, if someone is interested in a project where this would come in handle, let me know.

    I might be interest some day in the distant future, but I'd be willing to donate some time in the interest in getting a project done. And it might be interesting and edutational, too.

    Leave a comment:


  • randyohoh
    replied
    Re: DIY PCB The Easy Way

    philthien - I saw a program that was developed for Eagle pcb layout software which created tool paths to do exactly what you described. The program WAS free but now there is a cost, like $20.00 or so. It worked with the free version of Eagle. It is probably still available on a hobby pcb forum somewhere. As I remember it the solder pads were "normal" so soldering should be ok. I think it was called isolation routing.

    Leave a comment:


  • philthien
    replied
    Re: DIY PCB The Easy Way

    Originally posted by Pete Basel View Post
    Just curious, what model is that CNC router?

    Can it hold more than one bit?
    It is just a little K2, it does not have an automatic tool changer. Rather, I'm the manual tool changer.

    If you google "cnc router pcb" you will see plenty of examples of the types of boards where minimal copper is removed.

    If anyone wants to give this a shot, I'd be willing to route a board or two to see how it comes out.

    My maximum x/y are approx. 10.5".

    Leave a comment:


  • hongrn
    replied
    Re: DIY PCB The Easy Way

    Thanks everyone for your comments. John, I like your masking tape method. I guess I feel much more comfortable manipulating the traces in a paint program. On thing about using a perforated board that I like, is that it allows you to position the components tightly together. I'm having a blast learning these new things.

    Leave a comment:


  • neildavis
    replied
    Re: DIY PCB The Easy Way

    Originally posted by Pete Basel View Post
    What brand do you use?
    I use the Decocolor pens, available at Michaels. The fine point is good for traces and the broad point is good for filling in large areas--it's good to have both. It looks like the Parma is comparable. You know it's a paint pen when you shake it--there is a mixing ball inside.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pete Basel
    replied
    Re: DIY PCB The Easy Way

    Originally posted by neildavis View Post
    There was a nice article about 35 years ago (years before the Internet--back when we read paper magazines) that described a very easy method where you use shellac in a Rapidograph as etch resist. I guess you can still buy drafting pens, but it turns out paint pens work just as well, and they are easy to find at your local craft store. Those permanent markers aren't very effective as etchant resist, but the paint pens are excellent. I've made many boards using this method, and I still think it's the easiest way to make quick boards at home. The article is here: https://archive.org/stream/radio_ele...e/n55/mode/2up . It's from their famous author series :D.
    Do you mean something like the Parma paint pens? They're nice having two size tips,
    note that the price is for 6 pens:
    http://parmapse.shptron.com/p/parma-...markers-6-pack

    What brand do you use?

    Just a note that Hong's method here is a variation on the Toner Transfer method
    and if you google it you'll find many tips on the type of paper to use, which printers
    work best, etc.:
    http://www.instructables.com/id/Chea...or-PCB-Making/

    Leave a comment:

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